Is macular degeneration a genetic problem?

Maybe. But family history not so critical in this disease- too many genes play a role.
Maybe. More evidence is available that there is a strong genetic component to disease development. Equally as important are environmental risk factors which interact with the genetic susceptibility like smoking.
Yes. There is an important genetic aspect involved in the development of amd.

Related Questions

Is macular degeneration genetic?

Yes. The lifetime risk of developing late-stage macular degeneration is 50% for people that have a relative with macular degeneration, versus 12% for people that do not have relatives with macular degeneration, a fourfold higher risk. Read more...
Some. There are a few inherited forms especially those in the young and those associated with drusen deposits that have strong inheritance. Less certain is the inheritance pattern of ordinary, older age macular degeneration - the data is still being worked out. You can help protect your macula with a good diet, avoidance of sunlight and stopping smoking. Read more...
Yes. Certain genetic variations (such as in the complement factor system) that are inherited put you at increased risk for macular degeneration. Read more...

My dad has macular degeneration and so do i. Is this genetic? Could my children have it?

Could be. There is no question that genetics can play a role in the development of amd. It is multifactorial though and just because you have a strong family history doesn't necessarily mean you will pass it down. But your kids will need to be closely followed when they're older. Read more...
Which kind? There are multiple types of md. Many are hereditary, i see age related macular degeneration every day in my practice. What we know about it: many genes on many chromosomes involved - genetic component, but also environmental or epigenetic factors including antioxidant levels. So for amd, there appears to be a genetic component, in addition to other factors. Read more...

What sort of problem is age-related macular degeneration?

A retinal loss. Age related macular degeneration is a disorder of the circulation to the central seeing part of the retina at the back of the eye. It is as if the circulation simply dries up and the light receptors (cones and rods) die. This produces loss of fine detailed vision. It's incidence increases with age and is common in those over 70. See your ophthalmolgist for diagnosis and recommendations., . Read more...
Loss of vision. Macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The photoreceptors in the film layer of the eye (retina) make by-products that are normally removed from the eye. In macular degeneration, there is an accumulation of by-products that eventually damage the center of the film layer, and thus central vision. Although there is no cure, new treatments are being evaluated. Read more...

Is it true that macular degeneration is a growing problem?

Yes. Macular degeneration is directly related to aging. Given the population with the increasing age, the increase is inevitable. Read more...
Yes. A lot of eye disease can be related to aging, and since we are living longer than ever overall, we have many growing problems. Read more...
Yes. . Age related macular degeneration is a growing problem as our population ages. There is no cure and it is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly us demographic. So, yes, it is true. Read more...

Do wet and dry macular degeneration create the same problems?

Not exactly. Both the wet and dry forms of macular degeneration cause decrease in central vision. Distortion is often an early symptom and an amsler grid is a good self screening tool. Vision loss from the dry form is usually slowly progressive and lessor in degree than the wet form which can have very dramatic decrease in vision that is rapid and significant. Read more...
Yes and no. . Dry macular degeneration (amd) and wet amd both affect central vision. However, the mechanism by which the loss of vision occurs is different. Dry amd causes pigmentary change and thinning (atrophy) in the tissue, whereas wet amd results from either fluid leakage from blood vessels or actual blood hemorrhage in the tissue. Generally, dry amd causes milder vision loss, and wet amd is more severe. Read more...

Will ookp help macular degeneration?

Which kind? Dry/nonexudative macular degeneration has no quick treatment, only areds vitmains to lessen the risk of future vision loss. Wet/exudative macular degeneration requires timely injections of medicine directly in the eye (intravitreal avastin, lucentis, (ranibizumab) or eylea). If your vision is severely bilaterally affected, you can see a low vision specialist. Ask your retina specialist today. Read more...
No. The osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (ookp) is a replacement for the cornea. The problem in macular degeneration is the other end of the eye, the retina. Read more...

How can I help my macular degeneration?

See ophthalmologist. Regularly, and in some cases, eye vitamins can help. Also avoid sun. Read more...
Which kind? Dry/nonexudative macular degeneration has no quick treatment, only areds vitmains. Wet/exudative macular degeneration requires timely injections of medicine directly in the eye (intravitreal avastin, lucentis, (ranibizumab) or eylea). If you're vision is severely bilaterally affected, you can see a low vision specialist. Ask your retina specialist today. Read more...

Can dry macular degeneration be reversed?

Probably not. Macular degeneration ir due to damage and atrophy of the macula, the central part of the retina where vision is sharpest. Two types (wet &dry) exist and treatment/ppognosis varies. The dry type is usually more benign and slower to progress. Treatment is aimed at halting progression. It includes smoking cessation as well as vitamin/antioxident supplements. Read more...
No. Classic dry older aged macular degeneration is progressive at its own rate. The areds vitamin supplement has been shown to slow the progression but nothing so far reverses the damage. You should be followed for this by a retinal specialist . Read more...