Can medication be used to reduce corneal swelling after cataract surgery?

Yes. Usually with time the swelling will improve. Typically we use anti-inflammatories such as steroids and nsaids. Muro or nacl can be used for bullous keratopathy. Speed of improvement is affected by endothelial cell counts and age.
Very often. When patients have post-cataract surgery swelling, in the majority of cases it is gone within a few days with the aid of non-steroidal and steroid drops to reduce the discomfort and inflammation associated with the procedure. However, sometimes, due to an underlying condition (ex. Fuchs endothelial dystrophy) the swelling may linger and may require partial thickness transplantation, called dsaek.
Yes. Some prescription drops are needed after every cataract surgery. Sometimes this is not enough, and over-the-counter drops and ointments known as muro 128 are needed. These are kept behind the counter, not in the eye care isle, because they should only be used by patients who have specific advise to do so.
Yes . Steroids are generally effective to reduce post op swelling. Muro128 which is a saline drop can also be used.
Corneal swelling. Corneal swelling after cataract surgery resolves with standard topical medications and a little time (few days typically). Rarely, the swelling may not resolve and corneal surgery may be needed.
Yes. Yes. There is a medication called muro 128 5% or the generic name is sodium chloride 5% solution. It's a concentrated form of salt that draws out the additional fluid from the cornea and helps "clear" the cornea faster.

Related Questions

Which medication reduces your corneal swelling after cataract surgery?

Steriod. Steroid and NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs/drops) reduce and help the swelling resolve. The biggest variable is time though. Read more...
Anti-inflammatory. The best medication for acute corneal edema after cataract surgery will be with topical steroids. This class of medications decreases inflammation and helps the cornea recover after surgery. Other non steroidal anti inflammatories can also be used. Read more...
Corneal swelling. The topical steroid (pink top, milky medicine) helps resolve inflammation inside the eye which helps resolve any postop corneal swelling. The corneal swelling resolves more due to endothelial cells on the inside of the cornea pumping the fluid out. Read more...

Is it normal to have retinal swelling and corneal abrasion after cataract surgery? I'm 54 had lasik in left eye 3/30/05 no problems good results. Had cataract surgery on 4/21/11 vision 20/200 swelling retina 350 micron with wrinkles and severe corneal abr

The . The cornea should heal completely in several days. The retinal wrinkles may represent chronic cystoid edema. Possible preretinal membrane. Often an intraocular injection of steroid is needed. See a university based retinal specialist. Read more...
The . The use of a hard contact lens should compensate for any corneal irregularity. Therefore, your decreased vision may be due to macular edema (retinal swelling). A macular thickness of 320 microns is greater than the normal macular thickeness of ~200 microns. Additional treatment options may include intravitreal steroid injection or macular laser. Discuss further treatment options with your ophthalmologist. A referral to a retina specialist may be also valuable, if not already considered. Read more...
Uncommon. Macular edema and corneal abrasion are uncommon after cataract surgery and require additional therapy. See your eye surgeon. Read more...
Not typical. Corneal abrasion is unusual but can occur and usually heals within a few days. Macular edema is more serious and is treated with nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory drops. Macular pucker or epiretinal membranes can predispose to cystoid macular edema. Retinal examination prior to cataract surgery can identify eyes at risk unless the density of the cataract prevents an adequate retinal examination. Read more...
Perhaps. Corneal abrasion at the time of cataract surgery can happen, but it is very rare. Certain conditions can increase the incidence (dry eyes, blepharitis, even previous lasik). The retinal swelling also is somewhat rare to the level you are describing, but it too still happens. Conditions like diabetes, uveitis history, and pre-existing wrinkling of the retina (epiretinal membrane) increase risk. Read more...

What is commonly used to heal the eye after cataract surgery did not go well?

Get a second opinion. If you are not getting answers from your surgeon, obtain a second opinion from another cataract surgeon. Good luck. Read more...
Depends. Need more details. Read more...
Complications. Complications are rare after cataract surgery but still happen even in the best surgeon's hands. Dense cataracts, pseudoexfoliation, small pupil, previous trauma, all increase risks). Your eyeMD can likely explain reasons for delayed recovery; if not, seek a 2nd opinion; more info [email protected] Read more...

Do flickers after cataract surgery go away?

Depends. True photopsia (flashes) after cataract surgery should be evaluated to make sure not retinal tear or detachment is taking place. Far more common is a flickering noticed by parients due to a new relection of light from the new intraocular lenses. Most people don't notice this after a period of time. Read more...
Generally yes. The so called photopsias that people discover postoperatively generally fade with time. Usually there is adaptation to the light flickers. Unusually, some people never fully adapt. Intraocular lens technology is usually the cause of these symptoms. Make sure you indicate to your eye MD that you have these symptoms. An exam is helpful to make sue the IOL is stable and the capsule is clear. . Read more...
Flickers, flashes CS. Flickers/Floaters after a non-complicated CS procedure can occur. Check with your eyeMD to be sure no vitreous was lost during procedure. If flashing or a significant numbers of floaters or a curtain coming down over your vision occurs, call your eyeMD ASAP to be sure there is no new retinal hole or detachment. More info: [email protected] Read more...

After cataract surgery. Creases where observed in capsule. Was this from the surgery?

Yes. But this is unavoidable. Using a jelly filled donut as an example, the cataract would be the jelly and the capsule is the rest of the donut. During cataract surgery, the jelly of the donut is removed and a thin lens is placed in the donut. How thick the donut was originally will dictate how much wrinkling occurs, as the donut shrink-wraps around the new lens. Read more...
Capsular folds. The lens implant is usually placed in the natural capsule that your natural lens was contained. That capsular bag can sometimes demonstrate some wrinkles or folds. This can be due to many reasons and is not usually detrimental. If needed a painless and effective laser procedure in office can eliminate the folds if they are visually significant. Read more...
No: capsular crease. The lens: usually clear, behind iris; is like a "pillow in a pillowcase". When cloudy/white & affecting vision (halos, glare)surgery needed. Goal: remove top part of pillow case (anterior capsule), remove pillow (cataract), keep back pillow case intact (posterior capsule), place a new lens; Recovery usually less than 1wk; 10-20% risk need laser after 1st surgery. More info: eyedoc2020.blogspot.com. Read more...