Is it painful to have lasik eye surgery?

No pain with LASIK. Before the lasik procedure, numbing drops are used so that there is no pain during surgery. My lasik patients receive a sedative and then go to sleep during their healing period postoperatively. By the time that they wake up from their nap 3-4 hours later, enough healing has happened that there is no discomfort. There can be a foreign body sensation if you do not sleep for a few hours.
No. Lasik is performed after administrating numbing drops. Patients feel some pressure during the creation of the flap. It is possible to have a scratchy, foreign body sensation for a couple of hours after surgery, which can be relieved with tylenol (acetaminophen). Most patients say it was so easy to go through that had they know that they would have had it sooner.
No. No. There is no pain before, during, or after lasik surgery. Sone irritation or scratchiness may be experienced for the fist 1-2 days postop.
LASIK does not hurt. The lasik process in of itself is not painful and most patients have no complaint of pain at any time. Some who do not fall asleep in the first few hours after their procedure do have some discomfort for a few hours, but it is mild and short-term.
Not like the past. Twenty years ago when i had my eyes treated it was about 11/10 for pain. Today by pretreating with non steroidal anti inflammatory drops ( like Motrin or Ibuprofen for the eye) along with other analgesics and (narcotics in rare cases) the pain is typically rated as no worse than 3/10 for the average patient. Your eyemd can provide soothing eyedrops for the first night or two also.

Related Questions

What to do if I have lasik eye surgery and will I be happy with it?

Generally happy. LASIK surgeons are sensitive to what patients are good candidates and which not. If you are accepted, then you probably have a favorable profile and should be happy. The goal usually is clear distant vision and that is almost always the case. A few may have some eye dryness or need a touch up to get the last power, but these are in general very happy patients. Read more...

I am planning to have lasik eye surgery. Can I travel after 1 week and go to the beach to relax?

Yes. You will still have to take the prescribed eyedrops and take precautions so the eye is not bumped or disturbed. But these are things you would have done if you stayed home. Read more...

Hi I want to know when you have lasik eye surgery, during the sugery what if my eyeball moves is that ok, or do I have to keep it still.

Do not worry . The movement of your eye is controlled by the surgeon during the procedure and you will not have to worry about it. Read more...
Lasers have tracking. During the procedure you will be watching a fixation light. Most of the excimer lasers used in this country have tracking devises. At the start of the procedure your surgeon will align the tracker. If your eye moves a small amount, the laser will move with you. If you move a large amount, the laser will merely shut off until you are looking at the light again. Read more...

Is it possible to have lasik eye surgery to correct vision problems caused by an eye injury?

Unlikely. If he eye injury was severe enough to change the focus of the eye, you likely are not an ideal candidate for lasik. Sometimes, with limited scarring of the cornea prk can be used to clear the cornea - this is lasik without the flap performed directly on the anterior corneal surface. Read more...
No. Most likely the eye injury will have damaged the eye enough that just doing lasik will not correct the vision enough, or sometimes the eye injury causes other problems that contraindicate getting lasik done. The best way to know if a good candidate for lasik is to have a preop eval. Read more...
Unlikely. Lasik will not correct serious problems from eye injuries. There is only a chance it may help if you can correct the vision with glasses despite the eye injury. It is very dependent on the type and location of the eye injury. Read more...
Most likely no. Injury to the eye often causes decreased vision, corneal scarring, irregular astigmatism. These things are not correctable by laser eye surgery. See a corneal surgeon for an evaluation to be sure though. Read more...

I am not able to have lasik eye surgery because of my corneas, but what about eye implants? I am desperate to be rid of my glasses and I recently had a lasik consult. They told me they could not perform lasik because of my corneas. Would eye implants be a

Corneal . Corneal implants are an option for a select set of near-sighted patients who do not qualify for lasik but are seeking vision correction. Intacs (http://www.Getintacs.Com/) are an fda-approved treatment for near-sightedness, and they work very well in patients with mild to moderate near-sightedness who do not have significant astigmatism. In general, the results of corneal implants can not be quite as precise as lasik or prk laser vision correction. However, in fda pre-market studies, 92% of patients were within 1d of intended correction with intacs (vs > 95 % with lasik), and >90% did reach the 20/20 level. If you would like to learn more about intacs and whether they would be a good option for you, come in for a free consultation. Read more...
In . In addition to intacs, as dr. Feldman suggested, intraocular lenses are now an option. For some patients, cornea laser refractive surgery is not recommended. Some patients have certain types of refractive error that are too great to correct with the laser. Instead, these patients could benefit from the placement of a lens inside of the eye. These lenses are called phakic intraocular lenses and have become an excellent alternative to laser surgery for select patients. Dr. Brad feldman who answered above is close to you. You should consider seeing him for a consultation as he is an outstanding eye surgeon. Read more...
ICL. Implantable contact lenses may be an option. See a doctor to be evaluated for this option. Read more...

Is lasik eye surgery safe?

Without question. This is a procedure, now with advanced laser technology machines, that has been performed millions of times with excellent results. Like all surgeries, there are a few risks but these are minor and uncommon. Dryness of the eyes after the procedure is common but not something one would consider unsafe. Read more...
Amost always. Nothing is 100% safe. Not even driving a car or crossing a street. Lasik is one of the safest procedures around but it's unrealistic to think in absolute terms of "safe" vs "unsafe". The patient has to be willing to sign the consent form that discloses everything that can go wrong (very rarely) and be comfortable taking a small chance for a big reward. Read more...
Yes. Studies have shown that lasik is safe. It has been performed for about 20 years. Around 32 million people worldwide have had it. As with any surgery, there are always risks and it is important to know the risks and benefits. Read more...
Yes. Yes. For appropriate candidates, lasik is the safest and one of the most common elective surgeries performed in the U.S. Read more...
Yes. Lasik is one of the safest procedures around. Like any surgery there are some risks. Read more...

Is lasik eye surgery worth it?

Yes. Yes. Lasik is less expensive and safer than long term contact lens wear. It also avoids costs related to glasses/frames and contact lenses/solution/cases/etc. Read more...
Yes. Low risk procedure that works really well...Definitely worth it. And the expense for getting a lifetime of decreased glasses and contact dependence is priceless! Read more...

Is lasik eye surgery recommended?

Yes. Lasik eye surgery is recommended for appropriate candidates who wish to decrease their dependance on glasses or contact lenses. Read more...
Lasik lasek. I can make anyone see better after my hi-def customvue wavefront epilasek than they see now in glasses or contacts, because the laser shoots a rx that is 25x more accurate than the one they give you in glasses or contacts, so i guess that means virtually anyone can get it (unless they have kc, etc). Read more...