5 doctors weighed in:

What is flush free niacin?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Niacin.

Supplementing with 2000-3000mg of flush free Niacin daily can help to control your cholesterol levels quite nicely, even increasing your HDL and converting your LDL to a less harmful subtype.
As a negative, Niacin can cause facial flushing and redness so get the flush free variety. And have your liver enzyme values monitored, as they can be affected by Niacin use.

In brief: Niacin.

Supplementing with 2000-3000mg of flush free Niacin daily can help to control your cholesterol levels quite nicely, even increasing your HDL and converting your LDL to a less harmful subtype.
As a negative, Niacin can cause facial flushing and redness so get the flush free variety. And have your liver enzyme values monitored, as they can be affected by Niacin use.
Dr. Dean Giannone
Dr. Dean Giannone
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Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Long acting

Niacin is useful to lower cholesterol level and has some other uses.
Taken as a standard pill, it commonly causes an itchy flushing starting about 1/2 hour after swallowing. "flush free" is formulated usually with delayed release so these side effects are absent or minimized. This does not affect the potency.

In brief: Long acting

Niacin is useful to lower cholesterol level and has some other uses.
Taken as a standard pill, it commonly causes an itchy flushing starting about 1/2 hour after swallowing. "flush free" is formulated usually with delayed release so these side effects are absent or minimized. This does not affect the potency.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Dr. Richard Bensinger
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Dr. William Cromwell
Clinical Lipidology

In brief: Modified niacin

Flush free Niacin can either refer to a slow release preparation or inositol.
Slow release preparations are better tolerated than immediate release products, but the lipid lowering effects are somewhat less potent. For comparable efficacy a higher dose of slow release is usually needed. Liver function should be monitored at higher dosages. Inositol does not improve lipids and should be avoided.

In brief: Modified niacin

Flush free Niacin can either refer to a slow release preparation or inositol.
Slow release preparations are better tolerated than immediate release products, but the lipid lowering effects are somewhat less potent. For comparable efficacy a higher dose of slow release is usually needed. Liver function should be monitored at higher dosages. Inositol does not improve lipids and should be avoided.
Dr. William Cromwell
Dr. William Cromwell
Thank
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