Does blood type affect kidney transplantation?

ABO blood type. Although ABO incompatible transplantation is done at a small number of transplant centers in the U.S., the majority of transplant programs will do transplants between ABO compatible donors and recipients. Hence, dialysis patients who are blood type O will have to wait longer for a donor kidney than other blood groups.
Yes . most centers will not perform ABO incompatible transplant and further your wait time on the transplant list is diff based on blood type. Group O is most common and most states have the longest wait times.
Yes. The vast majority of kidney transplants are done between ABO compatible donor and recipients. Some recipients have very low titers of antibodies against the ab antigens, and they can have a successful transplant if given extra immunosuppression. Remember an o donor can given to anyone and an ab recipient can accept an organ from anyone.

Related Questions

Is it safe for a kidney transplant patient to donate blood?

No. The reason is primarily that recipients take immunosuppressive drugs that are in the blood, and would be transferred with the donated blood which is not safe. In addition, many kidney recipients have some anemia that would preclude donation. Read more...

How is it possible for a blood test find a male "y" chromosome in a females blood after she got a kidney transplant?

Microchimerism. The leukocytes in the transplanted kidney may enter the circulation of the recipient and stay there for years. If the donor was a male the circulating lymphocytes form the donor would carry a y chromosome. Read more...

How rare is antigen 69. My father, brother, and I have this and was found during tissue typing for my kidney transplant.?

Not common. If you mean hla a69; it is not too common, detected in <5% of the population in the us. More important is if you have a negative crossmatch with potential donors. This is done by incubating your serum with white blood cells-lymphocytes from potential donors. Read more...

How successful is the kidney transplant if the donor has a different blood group? Does the graft have chancesof failing early?

Great if compatible. Excellent outcomes occur for kidney donors with different blood groups than their recipients if the pair is compatible (don a-recip ab; don b - recip ab; don o-recip a, b orab). Incompatible paired kidney transplants are subject to antibody based rejection due to the difference in blood types. Prevention with plasmapheresis, use of Rituxan (rituximab) is good not perfect. Yes, early failure can still happen. Read more...
These can work well. Blood group incompatable transplants (for example donor is a, recipient is o) can be done quite well with the addition of plasmapheresis prior to and after the transplant procedure. The main issue is what is called the "antibody titer" in the recipient. If the titer is low enough, a blood group incompatable transplant can be done. Many centers in the us offer this option. Read more...

How can a lung blood clot occur when you just have had kidney transplant?

Easily. There are many risk factors for developing blood clots. Surgery itself is a risk factor, as is the decreased activity frequently seen after operations. Age, medications, and other conditions also affect risk. Patients with risk should receive prophylaxis, out preventative measures, bit this is still not a guarantee against developing clots. Read more...
Pulmonary embolus. A blood clot in the leg or pelvis (also called deep venous thrombosis) can occur with any major abdominal surgery. Smoking, obesity, prolonged immobility, or chronic medical condition can increase this chance. These blood clots can travel to the lungs causing a pulmonary embolus. Read more...

How can a lung blood clot occur when you just have had kidney transplant?

Risk of blood clot. Any major surgery, such as transplant, carries a risk of developing blood clots in the legs, deep vein thromboisi (dvt). Clot gets in the lung, pulmonary embolus (pe), when a piece breaks off from the leg DVT and travels into the lungs via the connecting veins. Read more...