Can people with peripheral vision loss drive safely?

Depends. On the amount of peripheral vision loss. A visual field is performed to detect the amount of binocular horizontal visual field. For example, some rules require it to be at least 20 degrees to drive. Driving safely with reduced peripheral vision means turning your head always in the direction you want to look.
Maybe. Peripheral vision loss may vary from undetectable to profound. One of the best ways to determine the loss is to take a visual field test followed by a careful exam. If the loss is in one eye then the possibility exists of an unrestricted license. Your local dmv has details and may require a road test. Your first visit should be with your ophthalmologist.

Related Questions

Are there people that drive ok with peripheral vision loss?

Yes, but. The patient needs to have a visual field test to determine how much field loss there is. Sometimes, there is so much that they cannot drive legally. Good luck. Read more...

Cause of peripheral vision loss?

No. If you are experiencing peripheral vision loss, you should be evaluated for glaucoma, optic nerve disease, or a possible mass or infiltrative lesion. Read more...

Peripheral vision loss due to ageing?

No. Aging in and of itself never causes peripheral vision loss. If you are experiencing peripheral vision loss, you should be evaluated for glaucoma, optic nerve disease, or a possible mass or infiltrative lesion. Read more...

Is peripheral vision loss symmetrical?

Sometimes. Depends upon the cause: if due to inherited retinal disease it is usually symmetric. If due to glaucoma or retinal vascular disease it is assymmetrical and spotty. If due to CNS problems like stroke, it is symmetrical and sudden. Read more...

What exactly can cause peripheral vision loss?

Many. The most common are strokes and glaucoma, but there are many others. See an ophthalmologist for evaluation. Read more...

Can you tell me about peripheral vision, however are vertical or horizontal prisms used for peripheral vision loss?

For motion detection. Central (macular) vision detects fine detail and colors. Peripheral vision has poor resolution but is highly sensitive to motion - it is your warning sensor for possible threats out of the center. Prisms affect both central and peripheral vision at the same time, so no prism will only change peripheral vision. Prisms are used to compensate for doubling; not a peripheral issue. Read more...