What are the treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer?

Chemo & RARE sx/rads. Chemo represents answers one through nine, however, if one has a solitary metastasis in the liver that is able to be surgically removed safely, this could be answer 10. Also, focused radiation (cyberknife or radiosugery as it it called) can sometimes be used to treat isolated mets if surgery is not possible.
Mainly Chemotherapy. The most common sites of metastatic spread of colorectal cancer are lymph nodes, liver, and lung. Generally, patients who have spread to the lymph nodes and beyond will receive chemotherapy if tolerated. In other certain situations additional treatments may also be used. Eg: if there's only minimal isolated spread to one organ such as the liver or lung then surgical removal may also be considered.
Many options. Colorectal cancer metastatic to liver or lungs is often treated with surgery if the patient is healthy and the liver or lung blood supply is unaffected. If surgery isn't possible, tumors can be starved by stopping their blood supply or treated with focused radiation. Chemotherapy is almost always used at some point. Many options may be used in sequence to get the best long term outcome.
Mainly Chemotherapy. Which may be combined with selective radiation, removal or ablation.

Related Questions

How effective is avastin (bevacizumab) as targeted therapy for the metastatic colorectal cancer?

See below. It is not a curall for colon cancer but is effective therapy to a large extent it depends onthe size and wehre it is. Almost certianly it requires more than this drug to get a cure if acure is possible. Read more...

What increases my risk for metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer at 85?

Lack of surveillance. Patients who have had previous colorectal cancers have risk of recurrence or metastasis based on their original diagnosis and treatment. Lack of careful follow up increases your risk of missing recurrence or metastasis early when it can be managed aggressively. Careful surveillance is the best way to catch anything early. Read more...

What are my treatment options for colorectal cancer?

Multiple. Colon cancer treatment regimens are designed for individual patients based on the patient, local resources and the evaluation of the cancer. Your individual treatment recommendation may vary between physicians or centers, so getting a second opinion is reasonable. Read more...
Depends on stage. Surgical resection is the primary treatment for most cases. However, the stage (extent of growth and spread) is very important to deciding on the treatment. If there is spread to other organs that cannot be removed, chemotherapy would be the primary treatment unless continued bleeding or obstruction prompt removal of the primary tumor. Radiation is important for rectal cancer that has not spread. Read more...

How long does a person live after undergoing colorectal cancer treatments?

Colon cancer. The answer to that lies in the stage of the dusease when diagnosed. We measure in 5 year survival based on stage. Stage 1(confined to colon)-95+%,. Stage 2 ( thru colon wall but not inlymph nodes)-85%. Stage 3 ( in lymoh nodes)-50%. Stage 4 ( metastatic disease in liver or lungs ) - <5%. The jey is to find it early. Get screened. Read more...

Is chemoradiation a good treatment for colorectal cancer?

Chemoradiation. It is a very good option for rectal cancer usually as primary or induction treatment followed by surgery. In colon cancer itself there are very few indications for radiation therapy but chemotherapy is widely used. Read more...

I have mai and colorectal cancer. Can I spread mia and do I need treatment? My sister tested positive for tb, did I give her this through my mia?

Complicated. I assume you mean mycobacterium avium intracellulare. It is not likely that you will spread this, but knowing how it was isolated and what disease (if any) it is causing would be helpful in answering you. It has not caused TB in your sister. It has nothing to do with colorectal cancer, except that your treatment may leave you immune suppressed and susceptible to disease by this organism. Read more...

Is it possible for stage three colorectal cancer to grow and spread during radiation and chemo treatments?

Yes it can do so. Cancer can and sometimes does grow/progress right through the given treatment. it happens when the Cancer cells are resistant to the chemotherapy which is the case in about half of colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. A change of treatment is then required as the new treatment(different drugs) may still have a chance to work on the cancer. Your oncologist can explain this better. Read more...