Can stem cell transplants cure multiple myeloma?

Remission. Multiple myeloma is treated classically with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. Both modalities can put the disease on remission and prolong life substantially. I personally do not offer allogeneic stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma unless on clinical trial or under very stringent circumstances. Multiple myeloma remains an incurable but very treatable disease.
Rarely. If it is an allogeneic or unrelated stem cell tranplant, there is a small chance.
Depends. It depends on which type, autologous stem cell which is your own stem cell can control it for lomg time but cure is not common, (, if you respond to it) but if it is allogeneic stem cells which is from somebody else, you , may have small chance for cure. But compications are very high.

Related Questions

Are stem cell transplants for multiple myeloma effective?

Yes. Autologous stem cells transplants (from yourself as donor when in near remission) result in improved progression free survival and probably overall survival. Allogeneic transplant (from someone else) is more complex, and many would consider it experimental. Although the procedure may cure the disease, there are significant complications and risks that may offset the benefits. Read more...

I have multiple myeloma. How soon after the first transplant do you advocate doing the second transplant? What is the success rate for the tandem transplants?

It depends. I am not a "transplanter", but i would not word your question the way you have. Some mm patients benefit from a second (tandem) autologous sct. This is something that needs to be discussed with the transplant team and i don't think is amenable to a generic answer. Read more...
Depends. If you only get a short remission from the first transplant, a second is not likely to do anything for you. More than a few years of remission might make a second one worthwhile. Read more...

My father died about 5 years ago from multiple myeloma. I was the bone marrow donor for his transplant. I am an only child and am wondering about my risk factor for myeloma, especially since my marrow was considered a good match.

About 2X risk. Sorry to hear about your dad.Being a donor doesn't change your risk. Multiple myeloma is not classically thought of as a familial/inherited cancer. However, the risk of a hematologic malignancy (mm, lymphoma, leukemia) in family members is thought to be about two times higher. Read more...
NCI Study... An nci study is looking at characterizing families that may be at higher risk to identify causes: screening individuals and families at high risk for hematologic cancers nct00052234 http://clinicaltrials.Gov/ct2/show/nct00052234?Term=nct00052234&rank=1. Read more...

My friend HS phyllodes. Tumor ws removd. Tissue around negative. Sd breast b moved? She hd multiple myeloma & bone marow transplnt. In remission now. Tx

Depends. Phyllodes breast tumors are rare and most are benign. It depends on the final pathology findings. Benign tumors only need removal with clear margins. Cancerous phyllodes tumors may need mastectomy. See this site: http://m.Cancer.Org/healthy/findcancerearly/womenshealth/non-cancerousbreastconditions/non-cancerous-breast-conditions-phyllodes-tumors. Read more...

How do stem cell transplants actually cure leukemia cancers?

They don't! Very high dose alkylating agent chemotherapy is used to kill the leukemia, and the autologpus (self) or allogeneic (antigen matched donor) stem cell or marrow elements rescue the marrow ablation caused by the chemotherapy. The high dose chemotherapy remains limited by other organ toxicities, and is not always sufficient to destroy the leukemia. Read more...
Chemo and more. There are two types of transplants but the most common type used for leukemia is called allogeneic where the stem cells come from a donor. As part of the transplant the patient gets chemotherapy, sometimes in very high doses which treats the leukemia. The new immune system from the donor can also attack the leukemia cells and lead to a cure. This is called the graft-versus-leukemia effect. Read more...

How can stem cell transplants actually cure leukemia?

It is one of the bes. Stem cell transplants do indeed cure some leukemias. The procedure requires total body radiation, high dose chemotherapy to kill all blood cells(including leukemia cells) and then we use stem cells to regenerate the normal bone marrow in order to form new healthy blood cells. Read more...