What's the difference between sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia?

Overlap. Nocturnal hypoxia is a drop in oxygen in the blood when sleeping. It's associated with sleep apnea, but also with hypoxic chronic bronchitis pulmonary hypertension and emphysema. Sleep apnea can be due to airway obstruction or of central origin. It causes reduced oxygen, often dangerously, and arousal from sleep, leading to daytime fatigue.
Similar. Sleep apnea is caused by a malfunction in the brain (central sleep apnea) or by blockage of the airway (by the tongue, tonsils, soft palate, or throat tissue) while sleeping (obstructive sleep apnea). Either of these problems can cause nocturnal hypoxemia (inadequate oxygen in the blood).

Related Questions

What are the differences between sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia?

2 different condtion. sleep apnea is when there is a cessation of airflow with sleep and breathing. The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea when the upper airway gets blocked. Nocturnal hypoxia is a general term for low oxygen with sleep. Sleep apnea can cause nocturnal hypoxia, though many other conditions can cause nocturnal hypoxia without sleep apnea such as copd or heart disease. Read more...

I recently had to have a sleep study done. It cam back that I have obstructive sleep apnea & significant nocturnal hypoxemia. Should I consider cpap or look into things further & see my other options?

Sleep apnea. CPAP is the first line treatment and the most acceptable thing to try a first. There are many options for face masks and even nosal capp apparatuses to try. Most people claim they get the best sleep of their lives with cpap. Give it a try before you give up on non surgical options. Good luck ! Read more...
CPAP. Although it takes some getting used to, CPAP is the most effective treatment. Read more...
CPAP is, will be, & Always has been the “gold standard” in sleep medicine because it works 100% of the time–but only in 25% or so of the population that needs it–so it is hardly “gold standard-worthy” in the eyes of many. In february 2006, however, the asm published a position paper stating that oral appliances are now an equal for mild to moderate cases of obstructive sleep apnea & should be used prior to surgery. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Severe sleep apnea is best treated with a c-pap that is the gold standard. Mild to moderate apnea can be treated with dental appliances that bring your jaw forward and open up the airway. Read more...
Depends. Having sleep apnea is significant, but how severe was your ahi. Moderate to severe osa carries a significant cardiovascular risk and should be treated. The gold standard would be a CPAP and this would be what your insurance generally covers first line. If your osa is more mild to moderate, you could consider alternative treatment options. Read more...