Are you required to have a prolapse to have stress incontinence?

No. Stress incontinence and prolapse often go together but they can be independent conditions. Stress incontinence occurs because of weakness to the tissue that holds up the urethra where prolapse occurs because of weakness to tissue/ligaments/fascia that hold up either bladder, vagina, uterus or rectum. Good resource for further info: www.voicesforpfd.org.
No. While prolapse and Stress incontinence often coexist, they can both occur in isolation. Patients can have incontinence without prolapse or prolapse without incontinence.
No. Not at all. Though they are sometimes related, there are plenty of people who have only one or the other.
No, not at all. Stress incontinence can occur due to any disorder in which the pelvic floor cannot support the increased intra-abdominal pressure that precedes stress incontinence. A thorough history and physical exam can help illuminate the cause for stress incontinence. Often, urodynamics testing and cystoscopy are indicated to rule out other disorders causing the incontinence. A urologist can help you.

Related Questions

Do I need a prolapse to have stress incontinence?

Not necessarily. Uro-gynecologist, gynecologist with expertise in stress urinary incontinence or urologist shoukld be able to diagnose ; treat. Majority of sui patients to not have bladder or uterine prolapse especially when they are as young as you. Read more...
Prolapse/SUI. No. Stress incontinence can exist independent of pelvic organ prolapse. In fact many women report that stress incontinence improves as their prolapse worsens due to kinking of the urethra. Read more...
No,... Remember: every life event always displays itself at a certain point of its pattern of full spectrum, from very mild elusive to very severe obvious state. How does a doc handle it? It's to work together with patients so to apply currently available knowledge, skill, technology, drugs, common sense, ; wisdom at reasonable time in reasonable way to reasonable person. So, pelvic floor prolapse... Read more...

Should pt/pelvic floor training always be tried before doing surgery for grade 2 prolapses and stress incontinence?

It can help. Pelvic floor exercises may improve your symptoms enough to where you can avoid surgery. You can also ask your doc to try a pessary as this is a non-surgical way to correct your prolapse and incontinence. However, surgery is usually the best when the above fails or if symptoms worsen. Find a good urogynecologist or a gyn with experience performing the newer procedures & good luck. Read more...
Pelvic floor. Many may suggest "pelvic floor therapy" for a variety of female urogenital problems, but in my opinion, it is unlikely to significantly improve moderate to severe stress incontinence or vaginal or uterine prolapse. Read more...
Probably. It makes most sense to exhaust all non-surgical options before resorting to surgery. Read more...
Not necessarily. Pelvic muscle training using biofeedback and electrical stimulation therapy can be a very effective treatment for incontinence. It is not likely to resolve your prolapse issues but may decrease the symptoms related to prolapse. The final decision to try this treatment should be based on your specific symptoms and a discussion of pros and cons with your surgeon. You may avoid surgery altogether. Read more...

I suspect I may have a prolapse. I am 45, have had 2 children and my mother and grandmother both had prolapses of the uterus. My symptoms are long term (ie the last year or so) feeling of pressure low down, discomfort and stress incontinence while exer

You may. Prolapsed uterus, when symptomatic, will cause the patient to experience heaviness sensation, a feeling like something is falling out, worse while standing or exertion . You need to be examined in order to ascertain the degree of relaxation and decide with your provider what type of treatment is suitable for you. Read more...
Sounds like prolapse. Considering your history and the symptoms that you describe you probably do have some type of prolapse. Many women can feel something bulging through the vaginal opening. To check, place fingers at the vaginal opening while seated on a toilet and bear down as if you are trying to have a bowel movement. Your doctor could determine exactly what parts are dropping and discuss treatment options. Read more...

What is stress incontinence caused by?

Weak pelvic floor. Muscular support allowing stress urinary incontinence causes wetting with coughing, sneezing etc), which can increase after childbirth or after menopause when ovaries stop producing estrogen and bladder neck and urethral lining thins out. Cystocele where bladder tends to prolapse into vagina. Uterine prolapse. Fistula between bladder and vagina. Many women are incontinent with urinary infections. Read more...
Torn Urethral Lig. Begin with kegel exercises to strengthen muscles that close urethra. Some women leak because of poorly supported urethra after having babies, which can be fixed with a urethral sling as an outpatient 10 minute procedure with minimal downtime. Others need medication for over active bladder. While it's embarrassing don't acquiesce to suffer in silence, ask for help. Read more...
Stress Incontinence. Stress incontinence: leaking urine with activity, cough, sneeze. It occurs because of a weakness to the ligaments supporting the urethra. Tthere are many treatment options. Follow up with a gynecologist, urogynecologist or urologist to discuss. Treatment options can be pelvic PT, topical estrogen, pessary, plugs, radiofrequency, bulking, slings Resources: www.voicesforpfd.www.ics.org. Read more...

How do I know if I have stress incontinence?

Stress incontinence. Stress incontinence is defined as the accidental leakage of urine with increases in intra-abdominal pressure. It occurs with such things as coughing sneezing laughing jumping lifting and exercise. Read more...
Leak with event. Stress incontinence usually has an immediate identifiable cause such as coughing, laughing, sneezing, running, hopping, or jumping. Leaking events are related to specific activities. Stress incontinence is usually not related to strong urges to empty your bladder. To be certain, see a specialist. Read more...
Leaking w/activity. Stress incontinence is a leaking of urine with cough, laugh sneeze, exercise, or standing Resources: www.voicesforpfd.org. Read more...

What do you recommend for stress incontinence?

Kegels. Kegel exercises work for about 70% of women with stress urinary incontinence. It takes 60 to 80 kegels each day for about 6 or 8 weeks to see improvement. If that does not work, then see your gynecologist or urologist for evaluation and management. Read more...
Kegels. Strengthening the pelvic floor, with kegel exercises or pelvic floor rehab is the first step in dealing with stress incontinence. If this does not offer the result you are looking for, surgery is likely the next step. Mid-urethral slings are extremely successful in solving this problem. Read more...
Here are some... - realize and accept: life is a process of contant struggle to cope with reality, certainty, uncertainty of ... - modify lifestyle with moderating fluid intake, voiding timely to avoid overfilling bladder, constantly ; correctly conduct pelvic floor muscle exercise, wearing pad for vigorous physical exercise soon after emptying bladder, avoiding foods/drinks which may irritate bladder; - surgery. Read more...
Stress Incontinence. Stress incontinence: leaking urine with activity, cough, sneeze. It occurs because of a weakness to the ligaments supporting the urethra. Currently there are many treatment options. Follow up with a gynecologist, urogynecologist or urologist to discuss. In meantime can try a tampon to put pressure on urethra. Change tampon frequent (at least after 4 hrs) because of risk of infection. Read more...

Are there natural ways to treat stress incontinence?

Kegels. Kegel exercises will decrease or stop episodes of stress incontinence in over 70% of women - who do enough of the kegels. It requires 60 to 80 kegels each day for 6 or 8 weeks to begin to see improvement in the leaking. The majority of women do not do enough kegels for long enough to see any improvement. Read more...
Yes. Performing kegel exercises (contracting the pelvic floor muscles) helps strengthen muscles that support the urethra and bladder. Weight loss also helps, by decreasing pressure on the bladder. If you are a smoker, quitting can improve symptoms as well, by decreasing coughing and the pelvic pressure that coughing can cause. Read more...
Yes. Avoiding stimulants and diuretics such as caffeinated products. Timing your voids to regularly go to the bathroom every 2-3 hours. Performing kegel exercises helps to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles and help reduce the gap in the musculature that can lead to bladder prolapse (falling down) that can lead to leaking urine. Read more...
No, but cope... No. There has been no known natural means to treat or cure stress urinary incontinence (sui), but there are some way to cope with: - realize ; accept the facts of life - life is a process of constant struggle to cope with reality, certainty, ; uncertainty of daily living; - void timely, not until a full bladder; - change protective pad timely; - treat UTI if any; - minimize urine-producing drin. Read more...
FEW. Stress incontinence is from a weakness of the ligaments under the urethra. Kegels will strengthen the muscles but doesn't do anything for the ligaments. You can try a pessary, which is a support device that you can be fitted for. You can try wearing a tampon, which can put pressure on the urethra. There is also a product for Femsoft Otherwise surgical procedures Resource: www.voicesforpfd.org. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: stress incontinence?

SUI. Stress urinary incontinece is the involuntary loss of urine due to a sudden or sustained increase in abdominal pressure, such as from a cough, sneeze, laugh, or from going from sitting to standing, running or lifting. Read more...
It can be defined as. Stress urinary incontinence can be defined as a urine-leaking anatomical disorder of patient's inability to coherently generate sufficient closing pressure / resistance in the sphincter segment of urethra to overcome a sudden increase of pressure inside abdomen/bladder from cough, sneeze, jump, lifting, other vigorous physical activities, etc. The cause of this weakness may include aging, surgery. Read more...

What is stress incontinence? What are some possible solutions for stress incontinence?

Stress incont. This is leaking with stress maneuvers like coughing or sneezing, laughing, straining. It can be improved with behavior modification, medications and surgery. It is very common among women. Read more...
Stress Incontinence. (sui) is caused by weakness in the support and function of the urethra - which normally acts as a valve to hold urine in the bladder until you want to pee. There are safe and effective treatments for most people with sui. Pelvic floor physical therapy and urethral sling surgery are the mainstays. Consult with a urologist or urogynecologist. Read more...
Stress Incontinence. Stress incontinence: leaking urine with activity, cough, sneeze. It occurs because of a weakness to the ligaments supporting the urethra. Tthere are many treatment options. Follow up with a gynecologist, urogynecologist or urologist to discuss. Treatment options can be pelvic PT, topical estrogen, pessary, plugs, radiofrequency, bulking, slings Resources: www.voicesforpfd.www.ics.org. Read more...