How is a posterior cruciate ligament injury typically treated?

Depends on laxity. If you have an acute (recent) PCL tear that does not cause much laxity, you will probably be treated with physical therapy that stresses aggressive rehabilitation of the quadriceps muscles, which are in the front of the thigh. Acute PCL tear that causes significant laxity or if you have injured more than one ligament, you may need surgery to repair or reconstruct your pcl.
Usually non-op. Most patients with an isolated PCL injury will not have symptomatic instability after completing rehab to focus on quad strengthening. If you do have symptomatic instability or the PCL injury is part of a larger injury, the ligament is reconstructed with a graft which is roughly similar to the way the acl is reconstructed.

Related Questions

How is a posterior cruciate ligament injury typically diagnosed?

Examination. Most good sports medicine professionals will be able to tell you whether or not your PCL is torn based on your history and the physical examination they perform. If there is a question, then an MRI can be ordered to confirm the physicians suspicions. Read more...
MRI. As well as by the history of the injury and current symptoms followed by a physical exam of the knee. Read more...

What are the common causes of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament injuries?

Trauma or fall. Injuries to the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments most commonly occur because of a traumatic injury (football tackle, soccer collision, etc) or a traumatic fall (skiing or snowboarding fall). Another cause could be from an auto accident (where the knees strike the lower dashboard area. Certainly there are other mechanisms for these injuries as well. Read more...
Knee Ligament. Many acl injuries are noncontact injuries, ie: no trauma. Often times, the foot is planted, and the knee will pivot around the lower leg causing the acl to rupture. Acl injuries are much more common than PCL injuries. Read more...