4 doctors weighed in:

How is a posterior cruciate ligament injury typically treated?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vasu Brown
Wound care
2 doctors agree

In brief: Depends on laxity

If you have an acute (recent) PCL tear that does not cause much laxity, you will probably be treated with physical therapy that stresses aggressive rehabilitation of the quadriceps muscles, which are in the front of the thigh.
Acute PCL tear that causes significant laxity or if you have injured more than one ligament, you may need surgery to repair or reconstruct your pcl.

In brief: Depends on laxity

If you have an acute (recent) PCL tear that does not cause much laxity, you will probably be treated with physical therapy that stresses aggressive rehabilitation of the quadriceps muscles, which are in the front of the thigh.
Acute PCL tear that causes significant laxity or if you have injured more than one ligament, you may need surgery to repair or reconstruct your pcl.
Dr. Vasu Brown
Dr. Vasu Brown
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Dr. Robert Purchase
Orthopedic Surgery

In brief: Usually non-op

Most patients with an isolated PCL injury will not have symptomatic instability after completing rehab to focus on quad strengthening.
If you do have symptomatic instability or the PCL injury is part of a larger injury, the ligament is reconstructed with a graft which is roughly similar to the way the acl is reconstructed.

In brief: Usually non-op

Most patients with an isolated PCL injury will not have symptomatic instability after completing rehab to focus on quad strengthening.
If you do have symptomatic instability or the PCL injury is part of a larger injury, the ligament is reconstructed with a graft which is roughly similar to the way the acl is reconstructed.
Dr. Robert Purchase
Dr. Robert Purchase
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