How is a hand fracture typically treated?

Immobilization. Any fracture will need to be immobilized. In the case of a hand fracture, the hand would be placed in a cast for approximately 4-6 weeks.
Splints, occ surgery. The location and character of the fracture makes a big difference on how hand fractures are treated. Treatment ranges from protected rom, to splints or casts, or even surgery.

Related Questions

How is a hand fracture typically diagnosed?

X-Rays. The most commonly used diagnostic tool for broken bones is an x-ray. Read more...
X Rays. Clinical examination by a dr will raise suspicion of a fracture. This is followed by X Rays which is still the first choice of imaging - however there are many elusive areas in the hand and wrist that do not show up easily on X Rays. A CT Scan may be needed to look at these bones if X Rays do not show any fracture yet suspicion remains that there could be a fracture due to symptoms. Read more...

What can cause a hand fracture?

Almost anything... The hands are very often injured because they are our connection to the outside world. Symptoms and signs of hand fractures include pain, deformity, point tenderness, swelling. They can be caused by direct blows to the hand, twisting injuries, and crush injuries. Read more...
Physics. Any force to the hand that can generate enough energy can cause a hand fracture. A finger twisted in a dog leash or jammed while tucking in sheets can be fractured. A hand bumped into the corner of a table or smashed during an auto accident can also be fractured. Read more...

What are signs of a hand fracture?

Pain and swelling. These are the two most common symptoms and they can persist for days. If in doubt, an xray can confirma fracture or help you make treatment decisions. Read more...
Pain. There are several signs. The most obvious one is a deformity. Without a deformity, then in the setting of recent trauma you would be looking for moderate to severe pain and swelling. There is usually a limited range of motion of the affected area. Sometimes you can feel a clicking or stepoff at the area of the fracture. Some fractures can cause a rotational deformity of the finger. Read more...
Multiple signs. - Swelling - Deformity of the wrist/ hand - Significant pain - Inability to move your wrist - Unable to move your fingers - Tingling in the fingers and hand when moving wrist - Change in color of the hand. Read more...

How to tell if I have a hand fracture?

Pain and deformity. Patient how fracture of the hand usually have pain, swelling and deformity in the finger and x-ray will show the fracture. Read more...
Bruises, pain, swell. Persistent pain with localized pain and tenderness always accompany hand fractures. Bruising is usually present and if the fracture is displaced meaning the pieces of bone are out of alignment, it will have a deformity that shows up in the fingers as a finger that is out of its normal position. The best way to diagnose a fracture is with an x-ray. Some fractures may require other studies. Read more...
Multiple signs. - Swelling - Deformity of the wrist/ hand - Significant pain - Inability to move your wrist - Unable to move your fingers - Tingling in the fingers and hand when moving wrist - Change in color of the hand. Read more...

What can I do to relieve a hand fracture?

Hand fracture. Initial management includes continuous elevation above heart level of the injured hand, as well as continuous ice. Immobilization with a splint is helpful. Correct treatment requires correct diagnosis, so have an x-ray and see a hand specialist. Read more...
Elevate. Elevation and immobilization of hand fractures is the best way to relieve the pain of hand fractures. Read more...

What could I do to help my hand fracture heal?

Help heal fracture. Protect your hand from further trauma. Live a healthy life style and eat a healthy diet. Excercise moderately with using the injured hand. Do not smoke. Take a multi-vitamin and mineral daily (can ones made from food). Read more...

What does it meant to have a common hand fracture?

Depends... I don't know where you were given the descriptor 'common'. This is not a medical term for a particular pattern of hand fracture but likely refers to a fracture seen commonly either in the hand or in that particular fracture you sustained. Read more...