Should I ski after having a total hip replacement?

Maybe. The risks of engaging in high impact activities following joint replacements are wear, dislocation, and fractures. However, if you were a good skier before the surgery, chances are that you can get back to doing it at a recreational level. But, if skiing is not that important to you, then you should look for activities which are not high impact and do not have significant fall risks.
Possibly. If you were a skilled skier before your hip replacement, you should be able to return to that activity after 3-4 months. You should stay within your ability and not get overly aggressive. A severe fall could lead to a hip dislocation or fracture around the prosthesis.
Dial it back a notch. I let my patients ski, but i suggest sticking to groomed hills. I have several extreme skiers who are addicted to powder and heli. If you fall, put your legs together!

Related Questions

Can a woman wear high heels after having a total hip replacement?

Usually... Most people become much more functional after the replacement than they were before. The barriers to high heels after a hip replacement are likely to be unrelated to the replacement itself. Weight and problems with other joints are much more likely to impact functionality. Read more...
Yes. Prolonged and daily use of high heel foot wear may cause problems in the feet especially the front part. But for short periods yes one can, but it is important to train gait with flat foot wear, feel steady and in control and then progress to heels to avoid risk of fall. Read more...
Absolutely. Wait until your walk is normal with flat shoes, and then you can kick up your heels! Read more...

Has anyone had problems after having a total hip replacement, just from the device?

Yes. The biggest issue with hip replacement devices currently is the ones that use a metal against metal bearing. This articulation produces small amounts of cobalt and chrome debris that in some patients has caused hypersensitivity reactions, necessitating further surgery. Occasionally, poorly designed devices break, but this is unusual. Read more...

How can I prepare for a total hip replacement?

Be informed... Ask questions, understand the procedure, the risks, the recovery time frame, the number of procedures a year your physician performs and whether or not the hospital has an orthopedic unit to manage you after surgery. Exercising as tolerated is always useful too. The stronger you are heading into surgery, the stronger you are coming out. Read more...
Pre-surgery Info. Your physician should provide you with instructional materials or even an entire class, usually run in conjunction with the hospital where you will be having your surgery. Generally a class is most helpful the week prior to your surgery. In addition your physician may want to order physical therapy to strengthen muscles that will be important during your recovery. Read more...
Conditioning. Although it is hard to exercise or lose weight if your hip hurts, any exercise is good. Either walking or swimming is an option. Doing straight leg raises and quad sets will help as well. I tell my patients to take iron supplements the month before surgery to help build up their blood count. Good luck. Read more...

What is involved in recovery from? A total hip replacement?

Rest. More of the hip replacement is about time and healing. There are certainly hip precautions and learning how to take care of the hip, therapy to be able to get in/out if bed, and general strengthening and conditioning to return to activity. However, it is more about resting and allowing the surgery to heal than anythig else. Read more...
Tissue healing. The bones and soft tissues must heal after tha. There is initial trauma and bleeding that causes an inflammatory response. Soft tissue healing occurs over 3-4 months. Bone ingrowth occurs within 6-10 weeks. Muscle function and strength return in 4-10 weeks depending on surgical approach. Patients can walk with assistance the day of surgery and progress rapidly with exercise and motion. Read more...

What restrictions will I have after a total hip replacement?

Hip restrictions. Depending on the surgical technique, there may be restrictions with positions of sitting, twisting, turning, and crossing legs; however, with anterior replacement techniques, there may be no restrictions. Read more...
Not many. After hip replacement, i allow my patients to return to any activity that they are comfortable doing. Every patient finds certain things they can and certain things they cannot do comfortably. For example, I have a champion powerlifter, but he is not comfortable jogging. I have a bilateral hip replacement patient who is training for a marathon. All i ask is that they get an x-ray every 1-2 yrs. Read more...
A few restrtictions. You may have a few restrictions in the first 6-8 weeks. Most patients can return to the activities they enjoyed before tha within 2-4 months. This may include some running and jumping activities. In general, long distance running is discouraged and some stretching exercises may put your hip at risk of dislocation. Your doctor can apprise you of what he feels is safe in your circumstance. Read more...

What movements are constrained following a total hip replacement?

THA. Hip precautions for posterior approach usually to limit hip flexion greater than 90 degrees, crossing legs past midline. Hip precautions for anterior approach usually less, but limit extremes of hyperextension and extremes of external rotation. Read more...
It depends... Early movement restrictions are based on the surgical method used. Extreme positions need to be avoided in the first 6 weeks no matter what. If an anterior approach is used, hyperextension combined with rotating the foot outward can be a problem. If a posterior approach is used, the risky move is hip flexion (bringing hip up to chest) combined with internal rotation. Read more...
Few if any. Total hip replacement should restore motion in an arthritic hip, often to the range that was present before arthritis developed. Implant position can impair some movement and some hip positions may be discouraged by your surgeon (ie: the splits, excessive hip rotation, hyperflexion with internal rotation, or some yoga positions). Read more...

Can I have a total hip replacement if I have staph?

Not if infection. With an active infection you should not have a hip replacement as there is a high risk of surgical infection.Someone who is colonized with staph , for example , carrying it on their skin or in their nose can be treated before surgery to allow a hip replacement to be performed. Read more...

Is it possible to have severe nerve damage following a total hip replacement?

Nerve. Depending on the surgical approach there are several nerves that are at risk. In posterior approaches the sciatic nerve can be damaged or stretched. In the anterior approach the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and the femoral nerve are at risk. If a nerve is injured it can recover but in some cases it can be permanent. Read more...