8 doctors weighed in:
What movements are contraindicated following a total hip replacement?
8 doctors weighed in

Dr. John Michalski
Orthopedic Surgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: Anterior total hip
No specific hip precautions for a direct anterior approach hip replacement.
Patient can bend over immediately to tie his/her shoes.

In brief: Anterior total hip
No specific hip precautions for a direct anterior approach hip replacement.
Patient can bend over immediately to tie his/her shoes.
Dr. John Michalski
Dr. John Michalski
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Dr. James Shapiro
Orthopedic Surgery - Reconstruction
2 doctors agree
In brief: Motion restrictions
After a tha, the patient needs to limit the following: 1.
Try not to bend the hip past 90 degrees until the doctor has given an ok. 2. No adduction. This means the knee of the operative leg should not cross the mid-line of the body. 3. No internal rotation. This means the foot point forward or outward. It should not point toward the other foot.

In brief: Motion restrictions
After a tha, the patient needs to limit the following: 1.
Try not to bend the hip past 90 degrees until the doctor has given an ok. 2. No adduction. This means the knee of the operative leg should not cross the mid-line of the body. 3. No internal rotation. This means the foot point forward or outward. It should not point toward the other foot.
Dr. James Shapiro
Dr. James Shapiro
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Dr. John Dearborn
Orthopedic Surgery - Reconstruction
1 doctor agrees
In brief: It depends...
Early movement restrictions are based on the surgical method used.
Extreme positions need to be avoided in the first 6 weeks no matter what. If an anterior approach is used, hyperextension combined with rotating the foot outward can be a problem. If a posterior approach is used, the risky move is hip flexion (bringing hip up to chest) combined with internal rotation.

In brief: It depends...
Early movement restrictions are based on the surgical method used.
Extreme positions need to be avoided in the first 6 weeks no matter what. If an anterior approach is used, hyperextension combined with rotating the foot outward can be a problem. If a posterior approach is used, the risky move is hip flexion (bringing hip up to chest) combined with internal rotation.
Dr. John Dearborn
Dr. John Dearborn
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