8 doctors weighed in:

How could I get rid of patellar tendonitis?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Daquino
Sports Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Listen to your body

Start by decreasing any aggravating activity.
Ice the area 20 min 3 times a day and try some over the counter anti-inflammatories. Exercises to stretch the tendon and strengthen surrounding structures are probably most important. A patellar tendon strap may also help- get one at a local pharmacy. If none of these help see your doc- you may benefit from pt. Sometimes foot mechanics contribute too.

In brief: Listen to your body

Start by decreasing any aggravating activity.
Ice the area 20 min 3 times a day and try some over the counter anti-inflammatories. Exercises to stretch the tendon and strengthen surrounding structures are probably most important. A patellar tendon strap may also help- get one at a local pharmacy. If none of these help see your doc- you may benefit from pt. Sometimes foot mechanics contribute too.
Dr. Stephen Daquino
Dr. Stephen Daquino
Thank
Dr. Qamar Khan
Pain Management
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Many Possibilities

Prolotherapy typically by itself will cause ligaments to tighten up, usually due to scarring or fibrosis of the ligaments.
However now prolotherapy is used to introduce new blood supply to the area and then many times following it with the prp and/or stem cells in the area can repair the tissue/ligaments by the hopes that the stem cells regenerate the same normal tissue type. Regenexx.Com

In brief: Many Possibilities

Prolotherapy typically by itself will cause ligaments to tighten up, usually due to scarring or fibrosis of the ligaments.
However now prolotherapy is used to introduce new blood supply to the area and then many times following it with the prp and/or stem cells in the area can repair the tissue/ligaments by the hopes that the stem cells regenerate the same normal tissue type. Regenexx.Com
Dr. Qamar Khan
Dr. Qamar Khan
Thank
Dr. Mark Hutchinson
Orthopedic Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Ouch

It is common in basketball players and jumpers and best treated with hamstring stretches, core and gluteal strengthening, a short coures of nonssteroidal medications and possible a chopat strap.
No guarantee however that it will go away. Surgery can also be don in resistant cases.

In brief: Ouch

It is common in basketball players and jumpers and best treated with hamstring stretches, core and gluteal strengthening, a short coures of nonssteroidal medications and possible a chopat strap.
No guarantee however that it will go away. Surgery can also be don in resistant cases.
Dr. Mark Hutchinson
Dr. Mark Hutchinson
Thank
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