2 doctors weighed in:

Which of the following asthma medications should I reduce if have no symptoms at all 1)controlling tablets 2)quick relief inhaler 3)steroid inhaler?

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Rosch
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology

In brief: Don't play doctor

That is a decision that you should make in consultation with your physician.
Your quick relief inhaler should only be used for acute symptoms and not routinely. The nhlbi guidelines other than younger children would suggest the oral controller tablet. The steroid inhaler is the primary medication otherwise for anything other than "intermittent asthma". Don't play doctor!

In brief: Don't play doctor

That is a decision that you should make in consultation with your physician.
Your quick relief inhaler should only be used for acute symptoms and not routinely. The nhlbi guidelines other than younger children would suggest the oral controller tablet. The steroid inhaler is the primary medication otherwise for anything other than "intermittent asthma". Don't play doctor!
Thank

In brief: See below

The steroid inhaler is your controller/maintenance for use daily/routinely.
The tablet is also assisting with the control/maintenance aspects of your asthma. Your action plan should advise that the quick relief (albuterol) can be decreased/increased in frequency depending on the severity or improvement of your breathing status.

In brief: See below

The steroid inhaler is your controller/maintenance for use daily/routinely.
The tablet is also assisting with the control/maintenance aspects of your asthma. Your action plan should advise that the quick relief (albuterol) can be decreased/increased in frequency depending on the severity or improvement of your breathing status.
Thank
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