Which foods help with repairs of knee cartilage?

None. Cartilage, by definition, does not have a good blood supply. If something does not have a good blood supply, it does not heal well (or repair itself). That means that you can eat anything you want, it will not help cartilage heal....Because it can't.

Related Questions

Can you use stem cells to repair knee cartilage?

No. Not at this time. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (aci) has been around for 25 years and involves harvesting cartilage cells, cloning them, then reinserting them back into the knee to produce new articular cartilage. This has been studied in labs, done on patients, and shown to work. There are no well done studies demosntrating the effectiveness of stem cells to repair knee cartilage. Read more...
Yes. Similar technology can be used for small areas of cartilage damage, but very few patients are good candidates for this kind of treatment. Read more...
Can Help. Use of adult mesenchymal stem-stromal cells (mscs) are currently in clinical trial in us/internationally. Trend is toward use of fat derived mscs, havested by liposuction, isolated and concentrated in tissue culture. Early reports suggest significant improvement in neurological, autoimmune and organ functions. Many more mscs in fat than bone marrow making ad-msc the center of most research now. Read more...
Yes. Both bone marrow derived cd34 stem cells and mixed population stem cells acquired from fat (fat derived mesenchymal stem cells, stromal vascular fraction stem cells, mult names) have been used successfully to repair knee cartilage in dogs, horses, and yes, humans. Read more...
It's Possible. Check out Regenexx.Com. The have the single largest registry in the country of patients with degenerative joint disease that have used their stem cell procedures with good outcomes. Obviously not everyone gets better, but a majority have found the ability to forego knee surgery. Read more...

How could a person be diagnosed with a knee cartilage problem?

Exam, MRI etc.. Symptom pattern, history of trauma, genetic factors, age (older, more likely osteoarthritis etc...), disease such as rheumatoid arthritis etc...Will influence the chance of having cartilage problems. Xray may show narrowing of joint spaces which suggest so..Mri is a more definitive test. I would consult doc for an evaluation and go from there... Good luck. Read more...
Hx physical mri. Pcp should be comfortable with this work up amd dx. Read more...

What is a good way to get exercise after tearing your knee cartilage?

Low impact exercises. Low impact exercises are generally a good idea when one is suffering from knee injuries. Riding a stationary bike, elliptical machines, or swimming are exercises that will help strengthen the muscles around the knee without causing significant discomfort. Avoid squats or lunges. Read more...
Depends. Assuming that you mean a meniscus tear, usually low-impact exercise such as a stationary bike or eliptical machine can help improve your range-of-motion and strength. Read more...

What happens to you when you have had all of your knee cartilage removed?

Bad things. It is exceedingly unlikely that all of the cartilage would be removed. Nothing good comes from having all the cartilage removed from a joint. Unfortunately when joints degenerate the cartilage surfaces can just fall off and then become a source of continued locking and joint irritation. If conservative treatment fails and symptoms are severe enough joint replacement is the only option. Read more...
Osteoarthritis. When cartilage is removed you are bone on bone which is painful and will eventually need joint replacement. Read more...