If my milk supply is decreasing, does that mean it is drying up?

Yes. If you are not feeding your baby as frequently as you were before, your milk supply will start to decline. It is still possible to increase your milk supply, however, if you want to. Pumping frequently in between feedings will help to stimulate your body to produce more milk. Also, be sure too that you are getting good sleep, remaining well hydrated, and maintaing a low-stress lifestyle.
Yes. If your milk supply seems to be decreasing you may not be breastfeeding enough or not emptying your breasts completely. You likely need to increase the frequency of your feeds or use a pump to keep the supply consistent or increased.

Related Questions

How can I manage my milk supply?

Supply and demand. Your body will naturally "manage" your milk supply based on your baby's intake. After nursing is well established, if there are times of the day when your baby takes less milk, your body will make less milk at that time. If you need to increase milk supply to store some, you can pump once a day after a feeding and start building up a back up supply. Read more...
Supply and demand. Milk production is determined by supply and demand. If you don't feel you have enough milk, nurse every 1 1/2-2 hours. Your supply should increase in 24-48 hours. If you have excessive milk you can either pump and freeze for future use, or gradually decrease the frequency of feedings. Your body with adjust the supply to meet the demand. Read more...
Supply and demand. If you are the mother of a newborn, nursing frequently will help to establish your supply. I encourage moms to nurse every 1 1/2-2 hrs. During the daytime, especially if the baby is not very demanding. At night, you should feed on demand, but no less frequently than every 3-4 hours. Once feeding patterns are established, feed on demand. Read more...

How can I reduce my milk supply?

Slowly wean. Whether you are directly feeding or pumping, decreasing weekly by one feed or pumping session over several weeks should work well. Read more...
Nurse less, try OTCs. If you have a problem with oversupply and are still nursing, reducing the frequency/length of nursing will decrease milk production over time. Peppermint and sage teas may help and antihistamines like diphendydramine and Cetirizine and loratidine might decrease your supply. If you have stopped nursing completely and want to stop lactating, bromocriptine is sometimes prescribed by docs for this. Read more...

How do I keep my milk supply up?

Keep milk flowing. By getting your baby on your breast repeatedly for feedings you will be continuously replenishing your supply. If your baby needs you to increase production she may bring her feeds closer together to allow further emptying, therefore signaling your body to make more milk. You can also pump after each feed to truly empty to get the same result. Good hydration is also key. Read more...
Pump. You can increase your breast milk supply by pumping or nursing more frequently. Also, be sure to drink plenty of water as increased hydration will improve your milk production. Good overall nutrition is equally important. Read more...

When will my milk supply come in?

One weeks. The first "milk" you will produce is colostrum, which is a thick, yellow, and protein rich fluid that provides your newborn with important antibodies and liquid. Anywhere between 3 to 5 days, you'll start noticing your breasts becoming larger and your milk supply will increase and start looking like "milk". Typically, by one week postpartum, your milk will have "come in". Read more...

How can I keep my milk supply up?

Empty your supply. Keep yourself well nourished, well hydrated and rested (as much as you can!). Actively empty your breasts with feedings or pumping to allow for maintenance and increasing of your supply. Read more...
Breastfeed and pump. If a baby is not breastfeeding often enough, or is not drinking enough milk from the breasts at each feeding, then the mom can use a breast pump to maintain or increase her milk supply. She can pump her breasts in between breastfeedings and/or pump right after each breastfeeding. The milk can be stored in a freezer for later use. Read more...

How can I increase my milk supply?

Empty breasts fully. If you are able to empty your breasts with each feeding or follow each feeding with pumping to release the final milk, your body will continue to increase milk production. Keep yourself well hydrated and nourished at all times and nurse frequently. Read more...
Lots of ways. Drinking plenty of fluids and trying not to stress about not having enough milk helps the most! you can also try teas with fenugreek or milk thistle. If you have a breast pump, pumping after your baby nurses also helps. Read more...

How can I decrease my milk supply?

Slowly. If possible, it is best to decrease your milk supply slowly over a couple of weeks. Start by going longer between feeds (or pumpings) and just pump or feed enough to relieve pressure, but not enough to fully empty the breast. You can do this at certain times of day if you just want to eliminate certain feedings. Read more...
Decrease feedings. Your body will adjust the amount of milk it produces depending on how much it perceives your baby needs. (that is why some mom's can successfully nurse twins.) that being said, if you cut down on the number of breastfeeding sessions (and offer either expressed breastmilk or formula), your body will over time cut back on the amount of milk it produces. Do this gradually to avoid engorgement. Read more...

What will increase my milk supply?

Longer time and freq. Feed frequently every 2-3 hrs, feed longer duration each time (20 minutes/side). Try not to get uptight. Drink plenty of fluids. Read more...

Why has my milk supply has suddenly increased?

How old is. your baby? When a baby nurses, stimulation of milk production occurs. Your baby is doing a good job of assuring his or her milk supply. Read more...
Increased. due to baby needing and suckling more stimulates more production as the baby grows. Read more...