Difference between a heel spur or plantar fasciitis?

Heel spur . Is a projection of bone on the bottom part of the heel. Plantar fascitiis is a broad banded ligament that originates from the bottom of the heel and supports the arch. The symptoms and treatment are virtually the same.
See below. Plantar fasciitis is thickening of the tissue with. Inflammation of the plantar fascia. Heel spur is a deposit of bone that is formed at the calcaneus due to the pull of the plantar fascia.
Bone/inflammation. Not all plantar fasciitis is associated with a heel spur. In fact, heel spurs are rarely painful. The heel spur is formed by pull of the plantar fascial ligament on its insertion at the bottom of the calcaneus bone. Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of the plantar fascial ligament.
Same. The conditions go hand and hand. You can have plantar fasciatis with or without a spur.
Simular. When there is excessive tension or strain in arch(plantar fascia) plantar fasciitis develops. If the tension is where the plantar fascia( or achilles tendon if back of heel.) attaches to heel, a sharp projection of boen called a spur often will arise. The cause is the same. The difference is wear the tension is.
A spur is a bony. Projection. The plantar fascia is a broad banded ligament. When it degenerates, it is known as plantar fasciosis. Plantar fascitiis technically means the ligament is inflammed. Many believe now there is actual degeneration and not inflammation. This was a landmark study performed by a dr. Harvey lemont.

Related Questions

What is a home remedy for plantar fasciitis and heel spur?

See below. Ice/heat, strtching exercises and massage. Even advil (ibuprofen) can help with inflammation isthere are no contraindications. Rolling foot over a frozen water bottle is often helpful. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections. Read more...

Plantar fasciitis for three years with heel spur. No help from eswt, pt, orthodics, night splints, day casts, icing helps a little. Now what?

Surgery. If you feel you exhausted all non surgical options, surgery is the next option. Read more...
Heel pain in women. If you have custom orthotics made strong enough and wide enough to keep weight and pressure off your plantar fascia you will be asymptomatic after 3 months of continuous wear. Many women only wear there orthosis in certain shoes and therefore inflame their plantar fascia when not wearing their orthosis. Consistency is key a tight calf muscle must be lengthened not stretched. Do static stretches. Read more...
Radio Frequency Abla. If all has failed and pain persists i would consider finding someone in your area that does radio frequency nerve ablation (rfna). It is minimally invasive and has high success rates. Read more...
Cortisone injection . Have you tried cortisone injections. They can make a big difference especially if you are already in a good semi rigid or rigid posted functional orthotic. Did you use the night braces that are adjustable so you can continue to increase your flexibility instead of reaching a set point of no further improvement? How about rolling your arch over a frozen water bottle for a few minutes 3 times day. Read more...
Surgery . A subtotal plantar fasciotomy either open or laparoscopic will rid you of your pain. Read more...
Consider surgery. When plantar fasciitis has become truly chronic and does not respond to eswt, cortisone injections, physical therapy, and conservative measures like orthotics and shoes, a plantar fascial release may be necessary. You might also talk to your doctor about a nerve entrapment that can cause heel pain: tarsal tunnel syndrome. This may need different treatment. Read more...
You may have ... Arthritis. Plantar fasciitis is a major feature of psoriatic arthritis, spondylitis, arthritis with inflammatory bowel disease, reactive arthritis, etc. You have not mentioned steroid injection. The absolutely should be tried. But if you have one of these conditions, you will need other medications, or it will return. See a rheumatologist before even remotely considering surgery! Read more...
My treatment. Please do not do any surgery unless your plantar fascia has a significant rupture. My treatment: increase circulation with nightly foot soaks, keep feet warm with socks at bedtime, and increase local circulation and improve pain control by activating the skin reflexes daily. (Principles of Intrinsic Medicine). Continue daily until symptoms are resolved. Read more...
THREE CAUSES. There are three general reasons people have heel pain-mechanical, neurologic, or rheumatologic. If all conservative care has failed including ESWT, and the reason is found to be mechanical, my next step is the Topaz procedure and a PRP injection. Regarding PRP, some love it, others hate it. Somewhere throughout this whole treatment, I would have gotten an MRI to measure the PF thickness. Norm=2mm. Read more...

Surgery on my foot due to plantar fasciitis, heel spur, tumour on nerve about 2wks ago. Painful still. Dr. Gave me a shot of cortisone didn't help. Next?

Follow up . With your surgeon, let them know your condition. Be patient but concerned. 2 weeks post- op is still considered part of the healing time. Read more...
Give it time! 2 weeks was yesterday so to speak. Right now please give it time. The surgery is done, right or wrong, but the best thing to do now is give it time. Making rash move in the post op period can be dangerous. In the future get on an aggressive calf stretching program. Read more...
Try physical therapy. Physical therapy may be of benefit for you. Discuss it with your surgeon and get the appropriate referral. Read more...
Needs time to heal. Heel and nerve surgery can take several months to completely heal. Post-op treatments could include anti-inflammatory medications, a night splint, physical therapy, a TENS unit, MLS laser treatments. Read more...

What sandals are good for plantar fasciitis and heel spurs?

None. Most sandals lack proper support and cushioning. If you insist on a sandal you need one with at least a 1/2 inch heel. Read more...
They aren't! The best shoes for a person with plantar fasciitis are those that have a sturdy back to them, which sandals don't have. You want a supportive shoe that cups your heel and holds it steady. Sandals tend to allow your heel and arch to function in whatever position it wants to, which might be what caused the plantar fasciitis in the first place. Read more...

Are there cheap inserts that can help my plantar fasciitis and heel spurs?

Yes. But they will not be custom-made for your feet, and they'll tend to break down in about a year or so, depending on how much you wear them. Custom inserts can last up to 5-10 years. Read more...
It is possible. Try over the counter arch supports, but you may need more supportive custom orthoces. Read more...
Possibly. Depending on your foot type, you may be able to find an over the counter arch support like "Power Steps." They do not work as well as a custom orthotics. Anything less than $30 will most likely not help. Consider seeking out a podiatrist for evaluation. . Read more...
What is "Cheap?" I REALLY like the products from the Spenco Medical (www.spenco.com) company. I have many great results with my patients using these. The ones with the most support are in their "Ironman" series, but the Total Support and CrossTrainers work well too. I like my patients to get the most firmness they can tolerate. You should expect to spend between $35 and $50 for something GOOD!!! Read more...

I have heel spurs (plantar fasciitis). Would surgery completely eliminate it?

Last resort. Normally this is a last resort since this is caused by improper biomechanical support. Injections, taping, orthotics and stretching exercises are often successful. Surgery to remove spur and release tension on plantar fascia can be considered if other measures do not work. Diagnosis should be re-evaluated first. Surgery if often but not always successful. Read more...
No. Surgery for plantar fasciitis is always a last resort treatment. You need to have a podiatrist evaluate you and recommend conservative therapies such as physical therapy, injections and tapings to help relieve the pain. The pain is usually caused by a tense achilles tendon complex and all you need is appropriate stretching exercises for your calf. Read more...
Only as a. Last resort. Statistics show that 95% of the time conservative methods resolve plantar fasciitis within 4-6 months.Surgery is indicated perhaps 1% of the time and shouldn't be utilized as a first line treatment. Read more...
Yes. If you suffer from plantar fasciitis and have exhausted all conservative measures then surgery would be indicated. The last resort is always surgery and releasing the fascial band is indicated when your heel pain has not resolved in 6-12 months. Visit heelpainnow.Com for more information. Read more...
Unpredictable. About 80% of the patients that have heel surgery are pain free. The surgery can take up to several months to completely heal. Other treatments prior to surgery could include the MLS laser and ECWT(extra corpeal shock wave therapy). Read more...

Can both heel spurs and plantar fasciitis get better over 6 months with stretching exercises and orthotic device? Are they self-limiting?

Yes. This is often the main treatment used for plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. Other treatments are available if thus does not work. Sounds like you have a good doc treating you. Read more...
Heel spurs. As heel spurs are boney , without surgery they remain. However, with what i call aggressive conservative care plantar fasciitis / heel spur syndrome gets better about 99.5% of the time. As said , it sounds like your doc is going about this correctly . Read more...
Yes. If you wear your orthotics, stretch and ice daily and refrain from walking barefoot, there is a great chance that your pain will eventually subside. . Read more...

I have plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. I'm in pain, had to move real fast, I felt a pop in my foot and it radiated severe pain. I iced it. Help!?

Ice it. Ice it. Elevate. Anti-inflammatories and tylenol (acetaminophen). Some people with plantar fasciitis have an experience like that and never have pain again, once the acute pain goes away. Read more...
Let me try to help. Plantar fasciitis and heel spurs are difficult problem to handle, we start with anti-inflammatory medicine and heel pads, if did not help i recommend steroid injection the last resort is surgery. Read more...
See a physician. It is probably a good idea to have an evaluation by a foot and ankle specialist. Read more...
Possible rupture. Your history suggest a rupture (large tear) of the plantar fascia. See your ortho or sports doc for further evaluation. After an x-ray to make sure there's no fracture, a cast or boot is often used in treatment. Read more...
Heel pain. This does sound like a possible rupture. See your podiatrist for an exam , x rays , and the help you need . Read more...

Heal spur and plantar fasciitis, I banged the bottom of my foot really hard and now I am in excruciating pain. Can not walk on it. What happened?

Heel Pain. Plantar Fasciitis is an inflammation of the ligament on the bottom of the foot called the "Plantar Fascia". One of the common causes is trauma. Start with icing the bottom of the foot three times a day for 15 minutes and take a over the counter Motrin twice a day with breakfast and dinner for 3 days. If no improvement see a Podiatrist. Read more...
X-Ray. I suggest getting an X-ray to make sure there is no fracture. See your local Podiatrist. Read more...