What types of peritoneal dialysis are there?

PD. As far as i know there is only one type of peritoneal dialysis. However it is personalized for each patient. There are several different catheters that can be used and the fluid used in the dialysis can be different based on a patient's membrane transport type and residual renal function.
See below. The process is the same, but it is done manually called capd, continous ambulatory pd, and by a cycler a machine [which connects to the tube and automatically fills in the fluid] at night called ccpd, continous cycler pd.

Related Questions

What type of dialysis access procedure would be necessary for peritoneal dialysis?

PD cath. A peritoneal catheter is introduced in the lower abdomen to allow for introduction of fluids in and out. Read more...
PD Catheter. The pd catheter needs to be inserted and positioned properly. This is usually done by a surgeon, but some interventional radiologists also place pd catheters. The majority of the catheter is inserted into the abdominal cavity and the outer segment is placed under the skin for a distance to the point where it exits the body and can be hooked up to the machine. Read more...

What is peritoneal dialysis?

Peritoneal dialysis. This is a procedure similar to hemodialysis. Instead of hemoldialysis machine the peritoneum (lining over the gut) is used to remove toxic products such as urea and creatinine. Read more...
Dialysis inside you . Hemodialysis involves blood leaving your body in a circuit that passes through a filter membrane, before being returned to your circulation. Peritoneal dialysis involves the patient instilling fluids into the abdominal space, via a surgically placed silicone catheter which remains in place. The toxins from the blood stream in the blood vessels flowing to the bowel loops, pass through to the fluid. Read more...
Done daily at home! The other doctors answered what peritoneal dialysis is, so let me add that PD is done every day - and it is done at home. One easy way to do PD is to use an automatic cycler, which dialyzes the person overnight! This can be done with less disruption to your life (at least comparatively!). There's no getting around it: kidney failure is a lot of work. But look into PD at home; ask your doctor. Read more...
Peritoneal dialysis. Since the others have told you about how PD is done. I might answer one other question I'm asked and that is life style changes. You are limited only as you limit yourself. I have PD patients of all walks of life and have travelled far and wide. The only thing they have to remember is to do their PD. They can either carry the solns w/ them or find a PD center they can go to and get their PD done. Read more...

How does peritoneal dialysis work?

Cleans blood. Fluid is infused into the abdomen. The fluid is separated from the abdominal organs by the peritoneal membrane. Toxins that build up in the blood will diffuse through the membrane into the fluid. This fluid is then drained from belly and that is how toxins are removed from your body. Read more...
Fluid exchange. A catheter is place in your belly (peritoneum) and the catheter is then used to fill your belly with a solution of fluid. This fluid will cause your body to release certain substances in the blood that your kidneys would usually filter. The fluid is removed after a time and this can be repeated. It can even be done while you sleep. Read more...

Does it hurt to get a peritoneal dialysis done?

Not usually. Placing a catheter to start peritoneal dialysis catheter may involve some discomfort in the postoperative period which may last a few days. Peritoneal dialysis involves filling the abdominal cavity with water like solution to remove bodily toxins. Overall peritoneal dialysis is virtually painless if done properly. Read more...
Typically, no. As the dialysis fluid enters the abdomen and "dwells" there, a person may feel "full" or bloated, but it isn't typically painful. A wonderful benefit of peritoneal dialysis is that it can be done at night while you are asleep. LGromko MD. Read more...
No. Peritoneal dialysis involves placing a catheter in your abdomen,It is done under local anesthesia. Once you learn the proper technique of doing dialysis, there is no pain.Sometimes you feel full in your abdomen due to the dialysate. If the peritoneum gets infected, you will have pain. Proper technique and practice of dialysis avoid pain. Read more...
No. Peritoneal dialysis does not require sticking you with needles. You get the catheter placed initially, then you just hook it up when you do dialysis. Please check this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1fx9sxVgqk. Read more...

What are some advantages of peritoneal dialysis?

Peritoneal. Peritoneal dialysis gives you many freedoms that incenter hemodialysis does not. You can drain and fill and then go live your life. Travel is easier as is work and activities. Most nephrologists would choose pd if they needed dialysis. Read more...
Easy to do. Peritoneal dialysis is the one form of home dialysis. It is easier to learn than home hemodialysis. There is no direct exposure to blood. It can often be performed at night while you are sleeping. It is easy to travel with. Read more...
Advantages of PD. There are several. PD is more natural with clearances than HD. PD allows larger diet ranges. PD is performed at home which provides control over time management. PD is gentler. PD is gentler on the heart. PD is gentler on residual kidney function and preserves residual kidney function better than HD. Read more...

What exactly happens during peritoneal dialysis?

Blood is cleaned. Special formulated fluid is filled in the peritoneal cavity in the belly which helps remove toxins and other waste products from the blood into this solution which is then drained. Read more...
Se below. The first part is a short surgical procedure to insert a tube the inside end is in the belly and a portion is outside. The outer part is connected to a machine which exchanges fluid into and out of your belly. While the fluid is in your belly waste products from blood are filtered through the peritoneum into thos fluid which is then discarded and fresh fluid inserted. This usually is done nigh. Read more...

Where do I go to get a peritoneal dialysis done?

Often at home. This procedure is typically done by the patient having kidney diseases who are appropriate for this type of dialysis. Once determined appropriate by the kidney doc and the patient, he/she is trained in performing this daily procedure at home.... Check with your doc..Especially the kidney doc.. Read more...

What are some complications of peritoneal dialysis?

Peritonitis. Infection of peritoneal fluid is the most dreaded complication although this can be minimized by practicing good hygiene when handling pd equipment. Muscle cramps, bloating, increased risk of hernia, poor diabetes control are some of the common complications. Read more...
PD Complications. Short answer - infection, loss of effectiveness due to changes in the bowel and abdominal cavity, and loss of catheter. Here is a link to a more thorough answer: http://www.Thirdage.Com/hc/p/561964/peritoneal-dialysis-complications. Read more...

Can someone who is doing peritoneal dialysis have a pet?

Yes. The main issues would be hygiene and cleanliness. It would probably be a good idea to establish a "pet free zone" in the area where you do your treatments to prevent contamination and infection. Also, don't allow you pet to bite, scratch or otherwise contaminate your catheter. Read more...
PD and pet. YES - it is essential though that the pet not be on the PD Cycler machine -- cats do this - and not play with tubings - cats do this too --- and that any cat or dog not be immediately present on bed or chair when doing connections and disconnections - pet should be out of room or at least 10 feet away - and be sure you hand wash and wear gloves properly - PETS are wonderful and therapeutic - !!! Read more...