5 doctors weighed in:

What does a dialysis fistula actually do?

5 doctors weighed in
2 doctors agree

In brief: "short circuit"

A patient who is on dialysis needs the machine to clean toxins from the blood that the kidneys usually do.
The patient's blood needs to get out of the body, through the machine, and back into the body. A dialysis fistula is made by sewing a vein to an artery. This short-circuits the blood flow and the vein becomes dilated because it experiences arterial pressures. This can be used for access.

In brief: "short circuit"

A patient who is on dialysis needs the machine to clean toxins from the blood that the kidneys usually do.
The patient's blood needs to get out of the body, through the machine, and back into the body. A dialysis fistula is made by sewing a vein to an artery. This short-circuits the blood flow and the vein becomes dilated because it experiences arterial pressures. This can be used for access.
Dr. Robert WorthingtonKirsch
Dr. Robert WorthingtonKirsch
Thank
Dr. Kevin Griffiths
Internal Medicine - Nephrology & Dialysis
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Access to blood

At dialysis needles are inserted into a fistual so bad blood (blood with abnormal electrolytes and toxins) are taken from your body and brought to the dialysis machine.
Then the good blood (blood with good electrolytes and free of toxins) are brought back to your body through the other needle in the fistula. The fistula provides the avenue where your blood can be treated.

In brief: Access to blood

At dialysis needles are inserted into a fistual so bad blood (blood with abnormal electrolytes and toxins) are taken from your body and brought to the dialysis machine.
Then the good blood (blood with good electrolytes and free of toxins) are brought back to your body through the other needle in the fistula. The fistula provides the avenue where your blood can be treated.
Dr. Kevin Griffiths
Dr. Kevin Griffiths
Thank
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