Are dental implants and bone grafts safe?

Yes. Dental implants have been around for many years . Proper treatment planning is the key for the success of dental implants.
Yes. Dental implants and bone grafting procedures have been around for decades and are very successful. As long as your doctor is well trained and experienced then you will be fine. Good luck.
Yes. If you are a good candidate for the procedures success rates are very high with few complications.
Generally safe. As with any type of surgery there can always be complications with the surgery or the healing.
Very safe! The implant itself has an extremely low allergenic potential. And the bone graft materials, even those from animals or human cadavers are irradiated and often washed in antibiotics (though check for antibiotic allergy issues) when placed in appropriate bone support, in a healthy, medically uncompromised individual, few dental procedures are as safe.
Implant/bone grafts . I have had both. No problem seek knowledgeable oral surgeon.
Yes. For the most part yes. The modern dental implant design has been used for more than 30 years with great success. As far as bone grafts, there are different types of bone grafts. We can graft with bone from human donor, animal donor, or even your own bone. You should discuss which type of graft is best for you with your dentist as there are advantages and disadvantages with each treatment.
Very . The success rate for implants is in the high 90's%. Grafts are equally safe, but not always as predictable if they are large and complex. Most that are done are more simple and equally successful. Of course, all depends on the situation and the patient, as well as the skill and experience of the operator.

Related Questions

Is a bone graft for a dental implants possible?

Frequently done. Many people who get dental implants need to have bone grafts, especially if the teeth that are being replaced have been missing for some time. There are a few different techniques to do this and usually costs extra. Read more...
Bone graft. Yes, not only its possible, it's done routinely in cases that there is not enough bone to support a dental implant, in many cases of immediate dental implant placement right after removing teeth also there is a need for grafting bone around the implant. Read more...
Yes. It is very possible. Assuming there are no medical issues and the area of the future dental implant have not had multiple surgeries with a history of complications, then yes it is very possible. Read more...
Yes! Depending on how much bone you have lost, there are several options available to you for bone grafting. You should seek a consultation with a dental specialist (prosthodontist, periodontist or oral surgeon) for an appropriate recommendation. Read more...
Usually. The grafting of bone, whether natural or artificial is very common. Sometimes done before implant placement, and often at the same time. Read more...
Yes. Bone grafting is very routinely performed in order to allow the implant surgeon to place dental implants. Performing such grafting will help ensure the proper position and size of the implant, which will directly affect the long-term success of the restoration. There are several types of bone grafting procedures which are possible, depending on the quantity of bone reconstruction needed. Read more...

Do those who undergo dental implant generally need bone graft?

Depends. Sometimes depends on what bone is available at the site to support and surround the implant when placed. Read more...
Sometimes. It depends on the amount and quality of bone a potential implant site has. Sometimes a site has to be augmented in order for an implant to be successful, and sometimes it does not. Read more...
Sometimes. Dental implant surgery and subsequent tooth replacement therapy require both adequate bone and gum tissue. It is not uncommon for an extraction site to be missing both or either--requiring replacement to insure success. Technology has advanced to the point where these tissues can be replaced relatively easily--often with bone from sources other than you the patient. Ask your dentist! Read more...
No. Much depends on the location and reason for the implant. More often the grafting is needed in the upper jaw in the back. When a tooth is lost, the bone can collapse, leaving a defect which needs to be rebuilt to have a good contour and amount of bone to support the implant. Read more...
Not always. Not every implant site needs a bone graft. It all depends on the quality and quantity of the implant site. Read more...
Depends. Depends on the skill of the dentist removing the tooth and how much time lasped between the extraction and getting the dental implant. Read more...
Depends. Not generally, however every situation is different. If your dentist feels extra bone would benefit you then have it done. Read more...
About 40% Do. In my experience, for individuals who have been missing a tooth or teeth for quite some time, there is at least a 40% chance that they will require some type of bone augmentation procedure to reconstruct the bone such that a dental implant can be placed. Even if the tooth is being extracted, a simple socket bone graft should be placed so ensure ideal placement of the future implant. Keep smiling. Read more...

3mos ago got dental implant on lt & bone graft rt side I got laid off can't afford to get crown & implant etc. How long can I wait? Will bg reabsorb?

Dental implant. The problem with having an unrestored dental implant is that, depending on how long you wait, the teeth on either side of the implant may drift towards the implant site. This would necessitate orthodontic treatment to re-align the teeth prior to restoring the implant. Talk with your dentist about how to maintain the site until you can restore the implant. Read more...
Until ready but.... Waiting to restore an implant fixture is not a problem. However, the space should probably be maintained with a temporary removable partial, unless the adjacent teeth are already part of a permanent bridge, an implant retained crown or other restoration. Discuss how to best handle this situation with your own dentist. Read more...
Type of bone graft. Yes, the bone graft will resorb. The time of resorption depends on the type of bone graft they placed. Some crystalline grafts, such as bovine, will take muck longer to resorb than demineralized bone allografts. Resorption also depends on the surgeon's technique, location of the graft, age of the patient, systemic illnesses, etc. A well placed crystalline graft with biologic mediators one year +. Read more...
Quite a long time... As long as the healing abutment is not loose I do not see much of a downside to waiting to restore it. As soon as your financial situation improves i would call the restoring dentist. Read more...
Be Proactive... Talk to your surgeon and prosthodontist about the situation. If the implant is ready to be restored, the prosthodontist can place a temporary crown to maintain the space until you can afford the permanent crown. As for the bone graft resorbing, this depends on the size, location, and type of graft that was done. You may be able to 'buy' some time but i would talk to your surgeon. Keep smiling. Read more...
No problem. The longer the better, up to 2 years then the benefit of waiting is not longer there. Periodic exam and cleaning should be done once a year to make sure your surrounding dentition is stable and healthy. Read more...

Is it possible that further bone graft be added during dental implant surgery?

Yes of course. While the best approach for successful implant surgery is to properly evaluate the bone quality and quantity prior to surgery time, (via. Cone beam ct scan), it is quite possible to add more bone to the surgical site at the time of implant placement. Read more...
Bone Graft. There are no contraindications to grafting additional bone at the time of implant placement. In fact, it can be very helpful in some instances. Read more...
Recommended. Bone graft procedures may be performed separately or together when dental implants are being placed. This procedure is done routinely upon the individual's condition.. A bone graft can create a more solid base for the implant integration and stability. Good luck. Read more...
Yes. Absolutely, we do it routinely. For example, when we do the full arch implant surgical / restorative treatment in one day, we keep the bone removed from reshaping the irregular contours and that removed when preparing the implant sites. This is then grafted wherever it is needed. Good Luck. Read more...
Yes. Additional bone grafting is and can be done when implants are placed to help restore contours or to provide bone where the implant may not be completely engaged in bone. Read more...

Is dental implant removal after two years painful with bone graft? Should I opt for anesthesia?

Depends. Depends on location & size. I like to think of this type of procedure more like doing a large filling or crown prep so the level of stimulation is about the same so some patients elect to do sedation above using the normal anesthetic. Anesthetic is the norm though. Read more...
HAH? You kind of mixed a few things together here. Why are you having the implant removed? Are you saying that you will have a bone graft after removal? Unless you enjoy pain I would get an anesthetic. Read more...
Yes Anesthesia. Of course your dentist will administer anesthesia before performing any procedure.. why are you having the implant removed? Has it failed? You need to tell us more of your circumstances before we can offer any advice. Read more...

I know bone grafts/augmentations are necessary for many cases of dental implants being applied, but is it the same case for dentures too?

Not Necessarily. Each patient is slightly different. Obviously bone grafting can help preserve the ridge... a good ridge will help support a denture. Read more...
No. In fact, it is not very successful to try augmentation/grafts if dentures are to be worn. The dentures will simple cause resorption of the new bone/graft as it does with the existing bone -- but usually at a more accelerated pace. We tried much of this in the 80's with little success. At your age implants are the best long -term solution. See a Prosthodontist - expert in implants/dentures. G.Luck. Read more...
Bone grafts. There are procedures to try to build up bone before the placement of dentures. However, they are seldom done and prognosis is questionable. That is why it is so important to try to preserve bone and teeth and not require dentures in the first place. The best way to get a good fitting and functioning denture is to be in the hands of a very competent restorative dentist. Read more...

Had a bone graft from cadaver dental implant. Done about a month ago Felt something pull out that looks like a small white worm. Could it be that?

Bone spicule. Yes, it could be a part of the grafted bone, or a piece of your bone that did not attach to the area. We call this a spicule (fragment) and is very common. Think of it as a small splinter working its way to the surface. Usually they feel very sharp to the tongue and much bigger than how small they are when they come out. I removed 2 last week. Not to worry. Good Luck. Read more...
Resorbable Membrane. Allograft (Bone from another Human Being) are powder or pellets. It was most likely Collagen Resorbable Membrane. Read more...