5 doctors weighed in:

How safe is pregnancy after getting a whipple procedure?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Orr
Surgery - Oncology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Unusual question

Hopefully this is a real question and not computer generated.
Whipples are uncommon in premenopausal women desiring pregnancy, as they are most typically done for pancreatic cancer or intractable pain from pancreatitiis. But if you are seriously considering it - look at the prognosis from the cancer (if applicable). What is your overall health and nutrition? If healthy and cancer free - go for it.

In brief: Unusual question

Hopefully this is a real question and not computer generated.
Whipples are uncommon in premenopausal women desiring pregnancy, as they are most typically done for pancreatic cancer or intractable pain from pancreatitiis. But if you are seriously considering it - look at the prognosis from the cancer (if applicable). What is your overall health and nutrition? If healthy and cancer free - go for it.
Dr. Richard Orr
Dr. Richard Orr
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Carlo Contreras
There are two types of patients where this is a very realistic and important question. The first is young women who typically are the ones who get an uncommon tumor called pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas. The second group is women who have Whipple operations for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas or duodenum. In these situations, you are absolutely justified in asking this question. A Whipple operation dramatically "reroutes" your intestines and pre-disposes you to a number of vitamin deficiencies that are extremely important during pregnancy. Additionally, many Whipple patients have smaller stomach sizes than before the Whipple. The main vitamin deficiencies have to do with absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins (Vitamins A, D, E, and K) and getting enough iron absorption. If you are a young woman who has had a Whipple and want to get pregnant, PLEASE visit your surgeon, a nutritionist, and a high-risk obstetrician. This team will be essential in helping you deliver a happy, healthy baby!
2 doctors agree

In brief: Depends

It depends why the pancreaticoduedenal resection ( whipple ) was done, if it for non cancer yes, expect some problems on various anastomosis, due to gravid uterus.
If it for cancer there is no 100% cure have to check with treating oncologist

In brief: Depends

It depends why the pancreaticoduedenal resection ( whipple ) was done, if it for non cancer yes, expect some problems on various anastomosis, due to gravid uterus.
If it for cancer there is no 100% cure have to check with treating oncologist
Dr. Addagada Rao
Dr. Addagada Rao
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Carlo Contreras
There are two types of patients where this is a very realistic and important question. The first is young women who typically are the ones who get an uncommon tumor called pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas. The second group is women who have Whipple operations for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas or duodenum. In these situations, you are absolutely justified in asking this question. A Whipple operation dramatically "reroutes" your intestines and pre-disposes you to a number of vitamin deficiencies that are extremely important during pregnancy. Additionally, many Whipple patients have smaller stomach sizes than before the Whipple. The main vitamin deficiencies have to do with absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins (Vitamins A, D, E, and K) and getting enough iron absorption. If you are a young woman who has had a Whipple and want to get pregnant, PLEASE visit your surgeon, a nutritionist, and a high-risk obstetrician. This team will be essential in helping you deliver a happy, healthy baby!
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