What is epilepsy?

Risk for seizures. Epilepsy is a clinical condition of a risk for seizures. Most common is symptomatic epilepsy in which a scar focus or metabolic disorder or genetic condition is the cause. Many epilepsies are called ideopathic because no definite cause can be found. Detailed history, thorough neurological examination, eeg, brain imaging, and genetic and metabolic evaluations may be appropriate.
Seizure Condition. Epilepsy is a condition where an individual has more than one unprovoked epileptic seizure. There are many different types of seizures, so one person's seizure may look different than other. People with epilepsy usually have an abnormal eeg consistent with that. Some forms are genetic; others may be due to head trauma, infection, or stroke. It is treatable with medication and surgery.

Related Questions

What triggers epilepsy?

Many factors. Epilepsy is the tendency to have repeated seizures. Although any of us can have a seizure if our internal environment is sufficiently altered, certain conditions can cause the brain to have repeated seizures. These include inborn abnormalities, brain tumors, brain trauma, vascular malformations, and others. These lesions cause an imbalance of irritability over suppression of electrical activity. Read more...
Please repost. Are you asking what causes EPILEPSY or what causes SEIZURES? These are not the same question. Please clarify. Read more...

What's myoclonic epilepsy look like?

Sudden jerks. Myoclonus involves a sudden involuntary jumping of a limb or even the trunk. It can be benign, as legs may jerk on going to sleep, or it can be very troublesome after contact with inadequate oxygen (hypoxia). A typical myoclonic epilepsy is "juvenile myoclonic epilepsy" which is not uncommon, and has the jerking, but also episodes of loss of consciousness. Specific meds are needed. Read more...

What are epilepsy treatments and side effects?

Medications plus. Most try medications first. Many are well tolerated. There may be brain (drowsy, dizzy, double vision) or GI (nausea) side effects, though many don't experience them. Certain special diets (modified adkins) may be of modest benefit in some. Stimulatiors may reduce seizures. Epilepsy surgery may be curative, and in the right hands does not lead to significant side effects. Read more...

An MRI should show if it was a tumor or something else on my head. Is that correct? What about epilepsy?

An MRI is. very sensitive for detecting brain tumors. If you have epilepsy, the MRI may or may not show signs. For seizure work up, special sequences may be performed in addition to the standard brain MRI. Read more...

Was diagnosed with unspecified epilepsy I am currently 7 months pregnant and have had seizures for about 3 years now. I'm not sure what unspecified epilepsy means been checked multiple times for preclampsia I don't have it. Thanks?

Unspecified. It basically means it hasn't been defined in your charting. I would ask the neurologist who made your diagosis if he/she can clarify if its grand mal, petit mal or other seizure type. A lot of times in billing we just classify something as unspecified especially if we aren't getting paid for the diagnosis. Your OB is only getting paid for OB diagnosis and may just be using a code to note . Read more...
Means we don't know. Seizures occur when a cluster of neurons start firing randomly and their electrical activity spreads to adjacent neurons. If this spreads thru-out the area that controls muscle movement, the result is a grand mal or whole body seizure. If someone who isn't sick and hasn't taken a drug or toxin has repeated seizures it's called epilepsy. If the SPECIFIC cause/source is unknown then its unspecified. Read more...