Is disordered eating the same as eating disorders?

Yes & no. Other symptoms of eating disorder need be present such as binging, purging, fasting, frantic efforts to lose wt., etc.

Related Questions

What are eating disorders?

When eating disrupts. Any time something that is normal becomes disruptive in a person's life for any significant period of time it can qualify as a disorder and might need intervention medically or psychologically. Eating problems are common medically and psychologically. Most common are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and those associated with those two. Severe medical illness almost always causes appetite loss. Read more...
5 signs to watch for. You may have an eating disorder if you answer yes to two or more of the following: 1) do you force yourself to vomit because you're uncomfortably full? 2) do you worry that you've lost control over how much you eat? 3) have you lost >14 lbs in a 3 month period? 4) do you believe you're fat when others think you are too thin? 5) does thinking about food dominate your life? (from aarp magazine). Read more...

What causes eating disorders?

Multiple stressors. Some likely causes are; sexual abuse, dysfunctional families full of ridicule regarding weight, size and eating habits, social pressures at school, home or organized groups one attends. Also medical problems affecting appearance, motor functions, speech or hearing. Our culture of thinness in the U.S. Is harmful. Clearly genetics has a role as well in "setting the table" for eating disorders. Read more...
No one cause. Causes of eating disorders are complex. Conflicts about body image, self-esteem, anxiety, depression, perceptual errors (over estimating how overweight one is), family values & biology all contribute. Anorexia (an) occurs more often among younger women, while binge eating is more common among males & older persons. Mortality rates are 6 times higher among an patients than in the general pop. Read more...

What causes eating disorders?

Eating DO. The specific causes are unknown. It is however believed to be combination of biological (such as genetic predisposition) , psychological (such as self-image distortions), &/or environmental factors (such as social isolation, early maltreatment, cultural, peer pressure) . As i tell my patients, "genetics loads the gun, environment pulls the trigger". Read more...
Biological base. In my practice, the majority of patients with eating disorders have bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, so a similar anxiety disorder. The majority also have had some form of physical or sexual molestation or abuse. In my opinion, the best treatments focus on the causes. Biologically based causes respond well to medications, and the psychological damage responds to psychotherapy. Read more...

How are eating disorders treated?

Medical, Psychologic. Interventions are the baseline interventions. Associated, may be nutritional counseling, residential programs, family counseling and self-help organizations. The most effective counseling, centers around cognitive behavioral therapy(cbt). Medication is almost always involved in the more severe eating disorders. At times it is difficult to treat but it can be successfully treated. Read more...
Depends . Treatemnt depends on the reason for the eating disorder. This could be counseling, nutritional advocacy, medications, hospitalization depending on severity and cause. Read more...
Get Specialist. Eating disorders have their own language and when possible all clinicians involved should have specialized expertise in this area. Many clinicians say they treat eds but ask and check up on what ed associations they belong to and ask if they attend conferences and special training. This is true for nutritionist, therapists, and doctors. Less qualified clinicians will cost time and health. Read more...
Tailored Treatment. There are many things to consider before coming up with a plan of treatment. In general, eating disorders are most effectively treated by a group of specialists working together closely in the patient's best interest. Typically, treatment involves help from medical, mental health and nutrition specialists. Good places to begin seeking more info & help: http://www.Anad.Org and http://www.Myedin.Org. Read more...
Treatment . Typically it's a combination of medication and psychotherapy. Often psychotherapy focuses on issues of control in the life of the patient. By this I mean control over the patient's control over their body and relationships. Read more...
It varies. The treatment very much depends on the type of eating disorder and its severity. Therapy is an important part of eating disorder treatment because research shows us that the core of eating disorders isn't food or weight, it tends to be a life-based or emotionally-based concern. In addition to therapy, working with a dietitian and physician can be helpful. Read more...

How are eating disorders defined?

Disability. The definition of a disorder is a condition that interferes with "normal function." a bit of fortune cookie wisdom that i like is "you are what you think about most of the time." by this definition, an eating disorder is defined simply by the fact that someone is always pre-occupied by their diet. Medically, though, the definition involves measurable adverse effects on the person's health. Read more...
Separate category . The dsm-iv tr (diagnostic manual of the amer psych ass, 4th edition, revised) lists eating disorders as a separate diagnostic category with bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa, or not otherwise noted as the three subcategories. See http://behavenet.Com/apa-diagnostic-classification-dsm-iv-tr. Read more...

Eating disorders not eating at all?

It varies. Eating disorders encompass a broad spectrum; there are eating disorders in which people restrict food intake or use exercise to compensate, and there are others that binge (eat a large quantity quickly) and then purge (try to eliminate the food via laxatives, vomiting, or other ways). In general eating disorders could be thought of as eating patterns that have a significant impact on life quality. Read more...

Could eating disorders be inherited?

Probably not. Inherited, but it can be a learned behavior. If your parent had an eating disorder, you would be exposed to their eating habits and your relationship with food could be modeled after what you observed growing up and what your parent taught you about food, body image, etc. Read more...
Not exactly. Some studies point to a genetic predisposition towards eating disorders, but in my experience it is not inherited in the sense of a medical issue such as heart disease. In families where both a parent and a child has an eating disorder, it usually has a basis in behavior rather than biology. The child is emulating the parent's behavior with food, weight, body image, etc. Read more...

What are examples of eating disorders?

Anorexia & Bulimia. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are the most common eating disorders unless you consider obesity and eating disorder. Read more...
Types of eating dis. Eating disorders are typically classified into 3 main categories - anorexia (food restriction), bulimia (bingeing and purging), binge eating disorder (bingeing). In addition to these big categories, there is something called subclinical eating disorders where the individual engages in unhealthy eating/purging/exercising patterns that may not fit neatly into one of the 3 categories. Read more...

What kinds of eating disorders are there?

More than imaginable. The two best known eating disorders are anorexia nervosa and bulimia and various combinations of the two. Another recognized disorder is compulsive overeating. However, there are many forms of disturbed eating which develop when people are unhappy with their bodies. These involve overexercise, restirictive eating, yo-yo dieting, night binge disorder, and others, all of which are unhealthy. Read more...
3 main types. 3 types of eatying disorders;Anorexia Nervosa ,Binge Eating Disorder, Bulimia Nervosa; other differential diagnosis might be considered Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, Body dysmorphic disorder, Major depressive disorder Obsessive compulsive disorder,Schizophrenia Social anxiety disorder (social phobia),Substance use disorders (DSM-5), other medical condition. Read more...