What is autoimmune hepatitis like?

Immune mediated . Autoimmune hepatitis is an immune mediated directed damage to the liver. Some hepatitis is due to viral infections or alcohol. Here this is the body attacking ones own liver hence the term autoimmune. There is more than one type of autoimmune hepatitis and your physician will guide you through this.

Related Questions

Can autoimmune hepatitis be passed on?

May be. There are some genetic factor causing autoimmune hepatitis. However, there is not a strong factor. Generally speaking if someone has autoimmune hepatitis children or future generation may or may not get autoimmune hepatitis or any other type of autoimmune diseases. Read more...

What are signs of autoimmune hepatitis?

Jaundice & big liver. Skin rashes & spider angioma (see photo) may also be seen. Generally the diagnosis is made when patients present with fatigue, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Examination reveals jaundice. Blood tests reveal liver injury and an autoimmune basis for the injury. Try this website for a more detailed discussion: http://digestive.Niddk.Nih.Gov/ddiseases/pubs/autoimmunehep/ . Read more...

What can be done for autoimmune hepatitis?

Medication. If you have autoimmune hepatitis, you should see a liver specialist. This disease can be treated with medication that suppress your immune system. If do not get treatment, the disease can progress and cause cirrhosis (extensive scarring of the liver) and eventual liver failure. Read more...

Autoimmune hepatitis not responding to medication?

Change. You may need to change to a different immunosuppressive regimen. If your liver specialist is not very experienced in treating this condition, you could consider getting a second opinion. If nothing works and your liver is failing a transplant could be an option. Read more...
Consider . A consultation with me. There are many treatment options available. Anytime treatment fails his can call a diagnosis into question. However, even with a secure diagnosis first line treatment can fail. If this fails there are second and third line therapies available . Read more...

What are the common complications of autoimmune hepatitis?

Untreated? cirrhosis. Autoimmune hepatitis is treatable, and often complications can be prevented. There can be a relatively sudden onset of jaundice and malaise, but it does not always have symptoms at first. Untreated autoimmune hepatitis can lead to chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Complications of cirrhosis can include edema (swelling), jaundice (yellowing of skin), liver cancer, many others. Read more...
Autoimmune hepatitis. Anemia, elevated portal hypertension, fluid in the abdomen, swollen blood vessels in the esophagus, liver failure, liver cancer. Read more...

Who are the people that can easily get autoimmune hepatitis?

Genes. The predisposition towards developing autoimmune hepatitis appears to be genetic. The exact triggers for it to occur in those with a genetic predisposition are not fully known. Read more...
Uncertain. Autoimmune disease in general is often genetically predisposed. If you have a strong history of autoimmune diseases in the immediate family , you are more likely to develop this type of illnesses. Examples of common autoimmune diseases include hashimoto's thyroiditis, grave's disease. Lupus , rheumatoid arthritis etc. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: autoimmune hepatitis?

Anti-liver antibody. Autoimmune hepatitis (aih) is a disease caused by antibodies directed against liver cells. It can cause the liver to become inflamed and even lead to liver failure. Treatment can include steroids and immuran, powerful suppressors of the immune system. Read more...
INFLAMED LIVER. Normally our immune system is our body's army. It attacks harmful trespassers like viruses and bacteria that cause infections. Autoimmune hepatitis is one of the diseases when our army gets confused and attacks the liver causing inflammation. I call it a "friendly fire" disease. Other examples of these include rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Read more...