What could cause thigh pain 6 months after total hip replacement?

End of stem. Some longer hip implant stems cause pressure on the bone in your thigh. Have your surgeon x-ray and check into this possibility. Also a loose implant can cause thigh pain.
Thigh pain. Agree with dr buechel, also consider implant loosening, infection, stress response, referred spine pain, periprosthetic fracture.
Many factors. Sometimes the difference between the stiffness of the femoral stem and the stiffness of the surrounding bone can create a stress reaction at the tip of the implant which would be felt in the thigh. That being said, any pain following joint replacement should be evaluated by your surgeon.

Related Questions

What are all causes of anterior thigh pain after 6 months of total hip replacement? Be specific

Need more info. Please be specific about all the details of your surgery and your medical conditions to help get an answer for you. Read more...
Multiple causes. Thigh pain could be from the femur or radiating pain from the hip joint region including the capsule and muscles. If there is a cementless stem in the femur, there can be activity thigh pain due to motion at the stem tip or a stress reaction in the femur from altered load transfer from the stem to the femur. This usually resolves with time but can be aggravated by too much activity. Read more...
Femoral implant. Depending on what type of metal implant was used, the implant may be far stiffer than young femur, which can create thigh pain when you do a maneuver that forces your femur to flex. The other cause could be a loose implant. If the implant is moving still inside the femur it will hurt. Read more...

I am a professional golfer had a total hip replacement left side 8 weeks ago. Last 2 weeks pain has returned in thigh and butt. Why and what to do?

Post op pain/neuralg. Consult your orthopedic surgeon for additional evaluation of the operative site, i would recommend the use of over the counter nsaids ( advil or aleve (naproxen) ) as needed until further evaluation. Must rule out infection, neuritis, neuralgia or post operative issues. Read more...
Pain after THR. Pain in buttock can be normal or it can be from your back. Pain in thigh is concerning and should be checked out. Things like early loosening or fracture can cause thigh pain. Pain with weight bearing is especially concerning for these two things. Pain in thigh and buttock at rest can be either from the back or a deep infection. You should get this checked out. Read more...

How is leg length discrepancy measured after total hip replacement? How long should one wait to evaluate?

Let me explain. Limb length discrepancy can be measured by a physician during a physical examination and through x-rays. Usually, the physician measures the level of the hips when the patient is standing barefoot. A series of measured wooden blocks may be placed under the short leg until the hips are leveled.If the physician believes a more precise measurement is needed, he or she may use x-rays. (scanogram). Read more...
Exam and x-ray. Surgeons are careful at the time of tha to equalize leg lengths. In some cases the hip will be more stable if slightly longer. Many patients will feel that the operative leg is longer the 1st month after surgery but in fact it is not. An exam and x-ray will show the true leg length and I do this at 6 weeks. Stretching exercises will resolve the feeling of it being longer. Read more...

What leg motions can be done after a total hip replacement?

HIP REPLACEMENT. I am not sure if all the movements are preserved like flexion, extension, abduction, etc. Probablly, rom is slightly diminised. Please ask the orthopedic surgeon. Read more...
It depends... Early movement restrictions are based on the surgical method used. Extreme positions need to be avoided in the first 6 weeks no matter what. If an anterior approach is used, hyperextension combined with rotating the foot outward can be a problem. If a posterior approach is used, the risky move is hip flexion (bringing hip up to chest) combined with internal rotation. Eventually, most are safe. Read more...

If a person had a total hip replacement (anterolatera), then what are stable leg motions?

Stable. These are exactly what their name implies; motions that promote a stable leg; and this is important especially after hip/joint replacement as part of the rehabilitative process. Ask the orthopedist/physical therapist for more about this. Read more...
Abduction and neutra. Usually abduction, flexion and external rotation within a range. Best to ask the surgeon his/her parameters. Read more...
Flexion type. With an anterior-type approach, the safe motions are flexion of the hip with internal rotation. Avoid hip hyperextension combined with rotation of the foot outward. Read more...