What happens in dysplastic nevus syndrome?

Close monitoring. Dysplastic nevus syndrome is a condition in which the person has many (often 100's) atypical moles. With the syndrome, one has a higher risk of developing malignant melanoma, which is a high risk skin cancer. For this reason, frequent and close monitoring with self skin checks and routinely by a dermatologist is a must.
Dysplastic nevus . Patients with dysplastic nevus syndrome have a large number of normal and atypical (dysplastic) moles. There is a strong inherited trait for the development of malignant melanoma. Those affected and their family members should be carefully and closely followed by a dermatologist. Some atypical moles may develop into melanoma. In other cases melanoma may develop on otherwise normal skin.

Related Questions

Is dysplastic nevus benign?

DYSPLASTIC NEVUS. THIS IS A NEVUS (MOLE) WITH AN ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT OR GROWTH OF CELLS. THIS SHOULD BE SEEN BY A DERMATOLOGIST WHO WILL DECIDE WHETHER TO EITHER WATCH IT PERIODICALLY OR TO CUT IT OUT -- BIOPSY IT -- UNDER LOCAL ANESTHESIA AND THEN SEND THE SAMPLE TO A SPECIALIZED PATHOLOGIST FOR AN EXAMINATION. Read more...

What does a dysplastic nevus look like?

ABCDE's of moles. Atypical moles that resemble melanoma often has one or all of the following characteristics: a for asymmetry; b for irregular borders; c for lots of different colors (or shades of brown); d for rapidly growing diameter; e for evolving or changing mole. If you have any moles with these characteristics, you should see a dermatologist. Read more...
Dark brown. A dysplastic nevus is often very dark brown and, sometimes, will have areas that are lighter than others. Biopsy is the best way of knowing if a nevus is dysplastic. Read more...

What do you know about dysplastic nevus?

Dysplastic nevi. "the moles look unusual, clinically, and they have some features in common with melanoma, so they may get biopsied. When they get biopsied, they may have some cytologic atypia, which is reported as mildly dysplastic, moderately dysplastic or severely dysplastic. This report may cause the dermatologist to re-excise the lesion to make sure that it is all gone so it will not become a melanoma. Read more...

Is it a common thing to have a dysplastic nevus?

In Certain families. A dysplastic nevus is the term for a biopsy appearance of the pigmented lesion under the microscope - cells with atypia. The lesion itself to the naked eye or under magnification has asymmetry, irregular border, & different pigment colors. Only with pathology can one be sure that the nevus has not become an active melanoma. Families with many dysplastic nevi are at increased risk of melanomas. Read more...

Severely atypical dysplastic nevus--is this really bad?

This is not melanoma. This can be associated with a family risk of melanoma in some cases. There are usuallly other family members with melanoma in that case. Frequent follow up with the dermatologist is needed, as well as reduction in sun exposure. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: dysplastic nevus?

Abnormal mole. A dysplastic nevus is a mole stuck in limbo. It is not a skin cancer but has some abnormal features that make it a concern. I hope this information is helpful. Stephen weber, M.D., f.A.C.S. Lone tree facial plastic surgeon. Read more...
Dysplastic Nevus. A dysplastic nevus is a mole which displays "atypical" properties. Certain characteristics such as irregular borders, or lack of uniform color make certain moles "atypical". Research has shown that dysplastic nevus have a higher incidence of developing into melanoma, a form of skin cancer. Regular surveillance by a dermatologist of these lesions is highly recommended. Read more...

I had a dysplastic nevus removed and it recurred. Should I worry?

Dysplastic nevi. "the moles look unusual, clinically, and they have some features in common with melanoma, so they may get biopsied. When they get biopsied, they may have some cytologic atypia, which is reported as mildly dysplastic, moderately dysplastic or severely dysplastic. This report may cause the dermatologist to re-excise the lesion to make sure that it is all gone. Get the dysplastic mole removed. Read more...

I had a shave removal that came back as "Lentiginous Junctional (Dysplastic) Nevus with mild atypia, to <0.2 mm OF. Is this of concern?

No. If it is not a melanoma, it is of less concern. Being dysplastic, is a pathologic concerning point, but with it's small size, I would closely watch it. "Mild atypia" is the key to the answer. That is why shave removal's never really remove these, just the top layer. If any increase in size, remove immediately. Read more...