What is no blast seen means in peripheral blood smear?

It's a good thing! Blasts are immature blood cells. They normally grow and mature in the marrow and then the more adult cells are extruded into the blood stream to perform their function. So, not seeing them in the blood film is a good sign we look for when evaluating someone with a blood disorder.
Good sign/no problem. No blasts in the peripheral blood smear is a normal finding. This means your bone marrow/peripheral blood transfer of cells is working properly, with no immature forms getting into the blood. If there were blasts there, a work-up for a possible leukemia or lymphoma would have to be done. Sometimes blasts in the blood may be from something else putting a strain on the marrow, but none is good.

Related Questions

My peripheral blood smear stated "no abnormal blasts seen." Does that mean there were no blasts seen or only normal blasts were seen?

No blasts. Blasts in the peripheral blood are not normal by definition. So if no abnormal blasts were seen, that means there were no blasts in the peripheral blood. Read more...

What does it mean when the result of your peripheral blood smear says that you have mild leukocytosis with absolute neutrophilia?

More neutrophils. It means your overall white cell count is a little elevated, and of those white cells, there are more neutrophils than what is in the "normal" range. This is slightly suggestive of a bacterial infection, but it is far from diagnostic; this is only useful in the setting of signs/symptoms that also suggest infection. It could be primary issues with the blood cells, or even just normal variation. Read more...
White blood cells. That means your total white blood cells are just slightly above the normal range and they saw a true elevation of segmented mature white blood cells. The range used varies and depends on the laboratory. This can be seen in different condition such as infection, inflammation, etc. Nothing that you have to be too concern about. Discuss with your doctor in detail however if you are concern about it. Read more...

Why do doctors count monocytes and not macrophages in a peripheral blood smear?

They aren't there. Macrophages reside in tissue outside of the blood vessels. Monocytes exist the blood and then transform to become macrophages (or macrophages repopulate themselves, depending on the location). Thus, only monocytes can be found in the peripheral blood. There are several subtypes of monocytes that we will begin monitoring in the near future to assess for certain diseases and treatment effects. Read more...

What diseases a peripheral blood smear shows? Can it show that there is an infectious disease or viral?

Many many Blood. and other disorders including Infectious disease/viral and bacterial! Hope this helps! Dr Z. Read more...
See below. A peripheral blood smear shows white blood cells(leukocytes), lymphocytes, red blood cells and platelets . Bacterial diseases will often cause an elevated number of leukocytes and viral diseases often cause an elevation of lymphocytes. But there are many conditions other than infectious that can cause an increase in these cells. And infection can be present even if the peripheral smear is normal. Read more...
Many different thing. can be seen on a peripheral smear. It can demonstrate signs of some viral, bacterial and parasite infections. It can demonstrate changes associated with cancer or other immune related problems. It can even demonstrate genetic problems like sickle cell disease or nutritional deficiencies. It's a very powerful tool in the right hands. Read more...

Could a yeast infection in the blood stream show up on a peripheral blood smear?

I'd you're lucky. A peripheral smear is very unlikely to show yeast but can easily show indirect signs of blood infection. The stains (coloring) used for peripheral smears are not the best to show yeast. Special stains can be used, but you still need a keen eye and a lot of luck. Read more...