What is the probability of getting skin cancer from a sunbed?

Definitely possible. There have now been studies showing that young women who regularly use tanning beds have an increased risk for melanoma later on. Use of tanning beds also prematurely ages the skin. Avoid them.
Overall, low. Going strictly by the numbers, many more people go to tanning beds then get cancer. However, the more sun/tanning bed exposure you have, the higher the risk. A family history of skin cancer and lighter natural skin tones also increase the risk. The best answer is to avoid tanning beds, save your skin and improve your appearance down the road.
Too high. Although the actual probability of cancer from limited exposure is relatively low, it is much higher than if you don't use a tanning bad! why take the risk?
1.5 to 2.5x increase. Using a tanning bed increases your chance of developing a basal cell carcinoma by 1.5 times and a squamous cell carcinoma by 2.5 times. You are literally paying someone to give you skin cancer and cause you to prematurely age your skin.
Numbers vary. However, using a sunbed, especially at a young age, has been shown to increase your chances of getting skin cancer. Skin cancer is most common in fair skinned individuals and increases the closer you live to the equator.

Related Questions

What are the chances of getting skin cancer from tanning bed if you only do it 15-20 minutes 3 times a week?

Higher than average. Would recommend you stop. We think it is cumulative exposure, so a little still exposes you to unnecessary risk. Read more...
Depends on duration. The main question is for how many years? Clearly cumulative exposure to tanning beds at a young age is a major risk for melanoma, especially for fair-skinned and red haired individuals. Melanoma cases have been rising for years, for a variety of reasons. My advice is to not use tanning beds at all-- it's not worth the risk! Read more...

Will everyday use of a sunbed cause skin cancer?

Yes it can. I would ask you to avoid it altogether. We see many young people die from melanoma caused by sun tanning beds. Just live a normal healthy life. Read more...

How many years would a person have to be using a sunbed to develop skin cancer?

No way to tell. There is no way to tell. But, using it any, increase your risk of skin cancer, and themore you use it the more your risk could rise. Read more...
No set time. Skin cancer's biggest single risk factor is sun exposure, combined with a person's skin tone. In the case of melanoma there are certainly other risk factors that aren't completely understood yet, as people get melanomas in non-sun exposed areas. One bad sunburn in your life increases the risk of developing skin cancer, more uv light exposure, the higher your risk, esp. Light skin/hair person. Read more...
No formula. Your risk of developing skin cancer from su exposure is the result of a complex combnation of several contributing factors such as your genetic predisposition, age, geographic location, severity and frequency of burns, complexion, immune status and several other factors. Read more...

How many years and how often do you have to use sunbeds to develop skin cancer?

See link below. Just as chronic sun exposure causes cumulative damage to dna over many years, so can exposure to tanning beds, both of which contribute to the development of skin cancer. http://www.aad.org/media-resources/stats-and-facts/prevention-and-care/indoor-tanning is a link to some useful information from the american academy of dermatology. Read more...
It depends. It depends on what type of skin you have. Light skin will usually get skin cancer sooner than darker but everyone is different. I would avoid tanning beds. Read more...

Sunbed up to 5/6 times leading up to my vacation, will it increase my risk of skin cancer?

Yes. Even one bad sunburn increases your lifetime risk of skin cancer. The greater your sun exposure and number of burns the greater your risk. Consider 30 sunblock with frequent reapplication if out in the sun. Read more...
Yes. Any exposure to ultraviolet light can cause both aging of the skin and damage to the skin cell's dna-which can lead to cancer. Ultraviolet light from the sun contains uva, uvb and uvc wavelengths. Most of the uvc is blocked by the ozone layer. But uva and uvb make there way down to our skin. Sun tanning beds use bulbs which imitate the sun's light and give off uva and uvb wavelengths . Read more...

I use to use a tanning bed now I'm worried sick. Could I be in danger of skin cancer?

Tanning beds... ...Have been shown to increase the risk of getting skin cancer, in addition to giving you wrinkles and photodamage. Spray tanning would be safer. Have your family doctor or dermatologist check you over for any suspicious new spots on your skin - but other than that, stop the tanning bed, and don't worry. Read more...
Tanning. There is no such thing as a healthy tan. Not only are you at an increased risk for skin cancer which can be potentially fatal but you will age prematurely with more wrinkles and blotchy skin. Use a self tanner and sun protection if you like the "tanned" look. See a dermatologist for a skin cancer examination to be on the safe side. Read more...
Yes, but... Learn how to spot possible skin cancers early, have them removed, and your chances of actually dying / being mutilated are basically zero. If you've got somebody special, have them keep an eye on every inch of your skin and spot anything that's suspicious -- it'll be fun and may save your life. Read more...
Yes. Tanning is not safe and is not recommended for anyone. It increases the risk of skin cancer and accelerates facial and body aging. Sunscreen with titanium and zinc can help protect you from uva and uvb rays, but avoiding sun exposure is best. Spray tanning and tanning lotions are a reasonable alternative to achieve a bronzed look, but they may not be safe for pregnant/ lactating women. Read more...

I used a sunbed in my 20ties, probably in total maybe 10 times. Now 34, worried about skin cancer. I have quite a lot of skin tags under my breasts.?

Surveillance. Have somebody -- a partner, a physician, or whoever -- keep an eye on your skin and be familiar with the appearances of the common skin cancers. Get the suspicious ones off before they can hurt you. It's as simple as that. Worry accomplishes nothing. Death from skin cancer is basically 100% preventable if you stay alert. The skin tags aren't a factor and aren't sun-related. Read more...