Related Questions

Mom has 5% heart function and dr says she doesn't need a heart transplant? She has 13 stints, defib., cad, chf, and COPD and she's only 45.

Get second opinion. Mom needs to be referred to a transplant center. She must not be a smoker else she will not be a candidate. She will have to get special blood work. With her copd, this is an added risk for any surgery. Having said this, get second opinion from a well recognized transplant center. Read more...
5% heart function . If all major arteries are open and there is no lack of blood supply then transplant is the answer. A repeat evaluation of ejection fraction will help. An ef of 5% is usually not consistent with life. I have seen many people with 15 % function improve to 40 % after cabg. All individual situations are unique and need direct input from a cardiologist and a surgeon. Read more...

My mom (56) had 2 attacks in 2 yrs. Then she died due to cardiomegaly&lungs with fluid&shortness breath. Was heart transplant possible? We r dipressed.

Heart transplant. So sorry to hear about your mother! it is possible she had heart failure that could have been helped by transplant. Perhaps her doctors felt she was too ill or had too many other issues to undergo such a massive procedure. Usually medications are the first step followed by assist devices as a potential bridge to transplant. Hard to know where she fit on that path. Sorry she didn't do well. Read more...
Possibly. The evaluation for a heart transplant requires multiple factors to be reviewed and for the potential candidate to be capable of of both the transplantation and the long- term follow-up. Unfortunately, not all people are candidates for a variety of reasons. Read more...
Sorry for your loss. Candidacy for heart transplantation is affected by medical and psychosocial factors. There is an extensive evaluation prior to being listed. Can't answer your question directly without more information. A continuing problem with transplantation is the limited availability of appropriate organs. Read more...

My mom who has been in hosp for 29 days now has copd, CHF and is a diabetic. She's having a heart catherterzation tomorrow. What are the risk? Should I be there for this?

Yes, . You should be there for this if it is possible. Your mom sounds pretty sick and no doubt could use the support. Heart catheterizations are very common but do carry some risk, especially when the person having it done is sick to begin with. Read more...
Cardiac cath. Cardiac cath is generally a safe procedure done under local anesthesia and mild sedation. In healthier patients major complications occur 1 in 10, 000 frequency, since your mother has other comorbidities, her risk may be higher. Common complication, are bleeding, infection, arrhythmias, heart attacks etc. Read more...

If a person has CHF and is not well enough to endure a heart transplant how long cana person live even if they have a defibrillator.

Severe CHF. You should discussed with your cardiology. It's a very complex question. There is no definite life span documented. Depend on the severity and the stage and treatments already attempted. In the us CHF is known to cause 55, 000 deaths each year. Prognosis poor if patients don't follow treatment recommendations. In my humble opinion prognostic studies not very reliable. Do not get disheartened. Read more...
Highly variable . & answer is best delivered by the treating cardiologist. Read more...

Is it true that when you have a lung transplant for cystic fibrosis you have to have a heart transplant as well?

No. Patients with cystic fibrosis often will have a double lung transplant. Heart transplant is only required if pulmonary hypertension is so severe in cystic fibrosis that it has affected the function of the heart. Thus, CF patients do not require heart transplant when they have lung transplant (the great majority of the time). Read more...
No. A heart-lung transplant is needed only on patients with significant pulmonary hypertension, usually in cases of congenital heart disease. This is not the case in cystic fibrosis, where lung transplantation alone is enough. Read more...
No. A simultaneous heart and lung transplant is needed for a small number of patients, usually with severe pulmonary hypertension. . In the us there were about 1600 lung transplants done per year, and about 30 combined heart-lung transplants. Read more...