What is a hypoechoic thyroid nodule exactly?

Fewer echoes on US. Hypoechoic describes the appearance of a nodule on ultrasound (us). It refers to a nodule that reflects back fewer sound waves compared to the normal thyroid tissue around it. While most thyroid cancers are hypoechoic, most hypoechoic nodules are not cancers. But a hypoechoic nodule may have a slightly higher risk of being a cancer than other nodules.
Dark on ultrasound. A hypoechoic thyroid nodule is a nodule that appears darker than normal surrounding thyroid tissue. This occurs because the tissue in the nodule does not reflect as many sound waves as the surrounding tissue. In general, hypoechoic thyroid nodules are considered more supicious for harboring a cancer. Your doctor will need to determine if there are other characteristics that warrant biopsy.

Related Questions

I have 2 thyroid nodules and 1 is hypoechoic and the other complex should I worry?

Depends. Hypoechoic, hypervascular, or calcifications on ultrasound need to be addressed particularly if the nodule is > 10mm. The solid component of a complex nodule can be benign or cancer. Typically a nodule greater than 10mm should be biopsied by ultrasound or smaller if there are calcifications or prior history of radiation or family hist. There is no ultrasound pattern that is diagnostic for cancer. Read more...
Needs complete eval. Your question cannot be answered without more info. You should see a physician who is experienced in evaluating thyroid nodules, who can determine if biopsies are necessary. Some of the factors that can influence that decision include size of nodules, appearance under ultrasound, family history of thyroid cancer, and change in nodule size over time. Read more...

Dr said follow up u/s in one year for 7 mm hypoechoic thyroid nodule. Is this too long to wait? Or normal?

Reasonable. A 7 mm thyroid nodule is considered well under the 1 cm size at which we start to be more concerned. There is no reason to aggressively pursue earlier follow up at your age. Read more...
It should be Ok. Most thyroid nodules are either benign or very slow growing. So a recheck in 6 months to 12 months later is quite reasonable. Read more...

Single hypoechoic solid thyroid nodule over 1cm with mild vascularity?

Needs FNA. Most nodules of the thyroid are benign. However, fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of a nodule is indicated in your age group for nodules over 1 cm in size. Having increased vascularity raises the index of suspicion slightly. You should have thyroid function (free T4, TSH) checked prior to biopsy. Read more...
Hyperplastic nodule. This sounds like a hyper plastic nodule. These are usually benign. In the absence of prior studies, this usually is followed up to show it's stable nature. If it changes or grows it would need a biopsy. Nonetheless would suggest an in depth discussion with your doctor. Read more...

Is it true that the majority of thyroid nodules are hypoechoic and although thyroid cancer is usually hypoechoic, most hypoechoic nodules are benign?

Thyroid nodules. Yes, that is true. Sometimes a nuclear thyroid scan is helpful to determine hot (benign) nodules vs cold (sometimes malignant) nodules. I'm sure you can request that test for clarity. Read more...
Size? It is correct that in younger people thyroid nodules are benign, however, us is not very good at ruling out malignancy. Close follow up of the nodule is needed with us every 6 months. If the nodule is larger than 1 cm, fine needle aspiration biopsy needs to be considered. Read more...