11 doctors weighed in:
What happens if you keep smoking with esophageal cancer?
11 doctors weighed in

Dr. Richard Mcgee
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
5 doctors agree
In brief: Higher cancer risk
Mouth, tongue, throat, esophagus, lung, bladder and stomach cancers are all associated with use of tobacco.
Smoking increases the risk of all these whether you have had one cancer or not. Stop smoking! go to the american cancer society for a stop smoking class- free usually. Talk to your doctor, use hypnosis, use patches, use gum, use anything that works. Use tootsie pops like telly savalas.

In brief: Higher cancer risk
Mouth, tongue, throat, esophagus, lung, bladder and stomach cancers are all associated with use of tobacco.
Smoking increases the risk of all these whether you have had one cancer or not. Stop smoking! go to the american cancer society for a stop smoking class- free usually. Talk to your doctor, use hypnosis, use patches, use gum, use anything that works. Use tootsie pops like telly savalas.
Dr. Richard Mcgee
Dr. Richard Mcgee
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Dr. Alan Wartenberg
Addiction Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Same as without CA
It keeps causing more and more damage, and will impair healing from any surgery you may have to remove the cancer.
Smoking may also impair the effectiveness of chemotherapy because it constricts the blood vessels which carry oxygen, nutrients and the drugs they are giving you. It increases the chance for new cancers, as well as emphysema and bronchitis. Please get help to stop smoking:it works!

In brief: Same as without CA
It keeps causing more and more damage, and will impair healing from any surgery you may have to remove the cancer.
Smoking may also impair the effectiveness of chemotherapy because it constricts the blood vessels which carry oxygen, nutrients and the drugs they are giving you. It increases the chance for new cancers, as well as emphysema and bronchitis. Please get help to stop smoking:it works!
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
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Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: What do you want?
If you can stop, then stop.
Smoking cessation may help some with making treatments easier, but will do little or nothing to affect the course of the disease. Some esophageal cancers do get cured, and stopping smoking reduces your risk for many other things, making the life that was saved more enjoyable. A dying person should be spared the unpleasantness of trying to quit.

In brief: What do you want?
If you can stop, then stop.
Smoking cessation may help some with making treatments easier, but will do little or nothing to affect the course of the disease. Some esophageal cancers do get cured, and stopping smoking reduces your risk for many other things, making the life that was saved more enjoyable. A dying person should be spared the unpleasantness of trying to quit.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
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2 comments
Dr. Loki Skylizard
I agree, if one wishes to just enjoy life and not bother fighting cancer, by all means continue to smoke. However, on-going smoking can have significant impact on attempts to treat and/or recover from treatment. A diagnosis of cancer does not necessarily equate dying. Survival depends on numerous factors, including treatment/s and success of said treatment/s. It is tragic to undergo aggressive treatment for esophageal cancer and then suffer complications associated with ongoing smoking and other adverse choices. Be well, choose carefully.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Skylizard and I both appreciate the terrible ironies that smoking has brought to our world. Perhaps something as simple as a desire to prove one's strength and finally overcome the evil that helped cause the cancer might bring some emotional satisfaction at last.
Dr. Loki Skylizard
Surgery - Thoracic
In brief: Why?
Treatment for esophageal cancer is hard, survival difficult.
The question is, "what do you want to achieve?". It makes little sense to undergo the difficult fight for survival while engaging in suicidal behavior. Please speak with your family, your family physician, your pastor/priest/rabbi, and figure out your goals. Fighting cancer is a yes or no proposition. There is no "little bit pregnant".

In brief: Why?
Treatment for esophageal cancer is hard, survival difficult.
The question is, "what do you want to achieve?". It makes little sense to undergo the difficult fight for survival while engaging in suicidal behavior. Please speak with your family, your family physician, your pastor/priest/rabbi, and figure out your goals. Fighting cancer is a yes or no proposition. There is no "little bit pregnant".
Dr. Loki Skylizard
Dr. Loki Skylizard
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Loki Skylizard
The most important thing is working with a comprehensive multidisciplinary thoracic surgical oncology team. Your team will evaluate and develop and individualized treatment plan.
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