4 doctors weighed in:

Is lymphoma genetic?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Noga
Internal Medicine - Oncology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Tough question

If you mean hereditary, there are a few families that have a high incidence of lymphomas.
If you mean, are there changes in the dna in lymphoma - the answer is yes...Several types of lymphoma have distinct mutations that can be easily found in a biopsy specimen. Also, individual patient's tumor genes can be analyzed by a technique called micro-array which shows common patterns in survival.

In brief: Tough question

If you mean hereditary, there are a few families that have a high incidence of lymphomas.
If you mean, are there changes in the dna in lymphoma - the answer is yes...Several types of lymphoma have distinct mutations that can be easily found in a biopsy specimen. Also, individual patient's tumor genes can be analyzed by a technique called micro-array which shows common patterns in survival.
Dr. Stephen Noga
Dr. Stephen Noga
Thank
Dr. Ephraim Hochberg
Internal Medicine - Oncology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Minimally heritable

Most non hodgkin lymphoma have a very small risk in first degree family members of the patient (children, parents, brothers and sisters).
Some lymphomas such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia and waldenström's macroglobulinemia have a higher risk of occurring in family members.

In brief: Minimally heritable

Most non hodgkin lymphoma have a very small risk in first degree family members of the patient (children, parents, brothers and sisters).
Some lymphomas such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia and waldenström's macroglobulinemia have a higher risk of occurring in family members.
Dr. Ephraim Hochberg
Dr. Ephraim Hochberg
Thank
Dr. Matthew Fero
Internal Medicine - Oncology

In brief: Acquired mutations

Lymphoma, like all cancers, is a disease that results from an unlucky combination of gene mutations inside a single cell during your lifetime.
Your body routinely repairs millions of spontaneous random mutations every day, and fortunately only a rare combination of these will cause cancer. Some are born with genes that make them more susceptible to certain cancers but this not so common.

In brief: Acquired mutations

Lymphoma, like all cancers, is a disease that results from an unlucky combination of gene mutations inside a single cell during your lifetime.
Your body routinely repairs millions of spontaneous random mutations every day, and fortunately only a rare combination of these will cause cancer. Some are born with genes that make them more susceptible to certain cancers but this not so common.
Dr. Matthew Fero
Dr. Matthew Fero
Thank
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