How is the blood affected in a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia?

Different ways. Although the word leukemia refers to cancerous white cells in the blood, many times the disease is growing so fast in the bone marrow that these cells never enter the blood and also, since they crowd out normal blood cells in the marrow, these are also decreased or absent in the blood leading to problems with infection, bleeding profound weakness.
See below... Usually the WBC (white blood cell) count is significantly increased and continues to increase if the leukemia is left untreated. Anemia (low rbc count and hemoglobin) and thrombocytopenia (low platelets) are also common findings. The leukemic cells traveling in the blood may infiltrate various organs. Very high WBC counts may cause increased viscosity of the blood resulting in thrombosis (clot).
Simplistic answer .. Leukemia is a cancer of bone marrow, where blood cells are made. Leukemia cells are like weeds in a garden that prevent flowers (normal blood cells) from growing. Patients may have low rbcs, low platelets, low neutrophils (a type of wbc). Pts may have symptomatic anemia, bleeding or life threatening infections. Plus the leukemia cells can cause tumor lysis or hyperviscosity syndromes, etc.

Related Questions

What is happening in the blood in a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia?

Blood abnormal. The lymphoblast count (leukemic cells) increases, anemia and thrombocytopenia (low platelets) develop. This is all due to uncontrolled proliferation of lymphoblasts in the bone marrow. Rapid treatment is required. Read more...

Could you tell me what happens in the blood in a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia?

ALL. The blood counts of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) are usually abnormal. This can show up as low red blood cells and/or low platelets. The white blood cell count can be high or low or normal. Abnormal white blood cells (blasts) may be seen circulating in the blood as well. Read more...
Simplistic answer .. Leukemia is a cancer of bone marrow, where blood cells are made. Leukemia cells are like weeds in a garden that prevent flowers (normal blood cells) from growing. Patients may have low rbcs, low platelets, low neutrophils (a type of wbc). Pts may have symptomatic anemia, bleeding or life threatening infections. Plus the leukemia cells can cause tumor lysis or hyperviscosity syndromes, etc. Read more...
See below... Usually the WBC (white blood cell) count is significantly increased and continues to increase if the leukemia is left untreated. Anemia (low rbc count and hemoglobin) and thrombocytopenia (low platelets) are also common findings. The leukemic cells traveling in the blood may infiltrate various organs. Very high WBC counts may cause increased viscosity of the blood resulting in thrombosis (clot). Read more...

Help! What is acute lymphocytic leukemia in a chronic stage?

CLL. Acute leukemia does not have a chronic stage or phase. There is a leukemia called chronic lymphocytic leukemia which is generally a slow-growing leukemia which may not need treatment right away. Read more...
I believe you have. These diagnoses confused. Chronic leukemias display an elevated # of wbcs with morphologic and functional features similar to the mature cells of that lineage (lymphoid-cll vs myeloid-cml). Think of it as not turning off the spigot when the bucket is full. Acute leukemias have features of immature cells for a lineage (aml vs all). Acute leukemias can arise from chronic ones. This is blast crisis. Read more...
See below... That is not standard terminology and, generally speaking, all does not have a chronic phase. It can go into remission for a variable period of time and then relapse, but at the time of relapse it's still an acute leukemia, not chronic. Remissions and relapses may alternate several times but each time it comes back it is still an acute process. Read more...

How rare is it for a child to have acute lymphocytic leukemia?

2.8/100,000. Acute leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children, comprises approximately 30% of all childhood malignancies, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia being 5 times more common than acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately 2500 to 3500 new cases of all are diagnosed in children each year in the United States with an incidence of 2.8 cases per 100, 000. Read more...

How frequently can relapse occur in acute lymphocytic leukemia (all)?

20-30. It depend to the type of ALL ,B cell ,T cell ,age of diagnosis ,bellow 2 years or above 9 years ,CNS involvement at diagnosis,but about 20-25% Read more...

My friend found out she has acute lymphocytic leukemia today. What can she expect?

Chemotherapy. All is generally curable in children, less so in adults. See this site for more info. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/acute-lymphocytic-leukemia/ds00558. Read more...
Can you give us ... More details such as her age, WBC count, CNS disease, etc.? It would help us be more specific. Generally, pts have several blood tests, chest x-ray, lumbar puncture and bone marrow aspirate/biopsy to gather details about the leukemia that impact rx choices. First goal of rx is to achieve remission with combination chemo, then comes post-remission rx. Evals along the way. Consider a clinical trial. Read more...

Can there be a set karyotype for acute lymphocytic leukemia?

In short no. The karyotype is important, and certain changes are higher risk such as t (4, 11) and t (9;22). Read more...
No. . Gross structural changes in chromosome number and structure can be identified by karyotype. There are many such changes associated with all development, yet many all patients have normal karyotypes. This doesn't mean mutations are absent. Modern techniques let us see changes across the genome at single nucleotide resolution. The critical role of epigenetic change is now also firmly established. Read more...

Please describe the mortality rate for acute lymphocytic leukemia?

It depends on Age. Children with acute lymphocytic leukemia are successfully treated and cured of their cancer in more than 80%. Adults do less well, with a mortality of about 50%. Read more...
Differs depending... On the subtype of all, age and risk stratification. Pts with b-cell phenotypes tend to do better than those with t-cell dz. Children tend to do better than adolescents and adults. There are also several molecular abnormalities with prognostic significance. Not enough room here to list. Taking all comers, survival among adults is 40-50% while for children, 80-85%. Ask if you need more specifics. Read more...

If a child has acute lymphocytic leukemia, can he continue with regular schooling?

Interrupted. The regular schooling will be interrupted for several months to a year perhaps or could be a bit longer sometimes- while receiving chemotherapy and +/- if transplantation is required. After everything is completed and if complete cure is achieved- and no major complication from the treatment, he should/would be able to resume regular schooling. Read more...
ALL. After the initial induction phase most often can continue schooling if treatment is uneventful. Read more...