Can thumb sucking disfigure the teeth?

Yes. The same as using a pacifier. It can cause rounding of the top front teeth and an over bite.
Teeth no, jaws yes. Thumb or finger sucking habit can pull upper jaw forward (buck teeth), prevent lower jaw from growing forward, and narrow the upper jaw (remember the roof of the mouth is the floor of the nose) which can affect breathing. If upper jaw narrowed and patient becomes mouth breather, can irritate tonsils and adenoids. Pacifier less harmful. Try to gently encourage discontinuing habit by 4th b'day.
Yes. While the thumb sucking will not disfigure the "teeth" it will disfigure the child's mouth in the same way that a pacifier habit will. The teeth will remain the same shape and size, but they can be displaced by the habit.

Related Questions

If my teeth flare out (because of thumb sucking), should I get braces?

Depends on age. If a child sucks his/her thumb past 6 years of age then permanent incisors can be flared and may cause permanent problems. If this habit is treated prior to permanent teeth erupting, a tongue rake can be placed in the mouth to retrain the child to keep his thumb out of the mouth. Once flaring has occurred in a young adult or adolescent then braces may be the answer. Read more...
Very possibly. Very possibly. Braces, even as a grownup, may have more benefit than just resetting your front teeth. Properly positioned teeth function better, are more easily cleaned so your gums are healthier, may improve TMJ and muscle symptoms and you might even breathe better. And - you'll smile more! Read more...
Flared teeth. The answer to this question is really up to you. Do you not like the way your teeth look? Is it giving your problems with eating? If the answer is "no" to the questions above then "no". However, if the answer is "yes" then go get a consultation from an orthodontist to see what they can do for you. You can also see a cosmetic dentist for other options, but i suggest starting with an orthodontist. Read more...
Braces. Yes, but if the thumb sucking continues then after the braces are removed then the teeth will flare again. So you have to address the thumb sucking habit. Talk to an orthodontist to discuss options. Read more...
Braces. Yes, you should. Teeth that are flared out are more prone to being knocked out of your mouth if you trip. However, the thumb habit will have to stop or the teeth will flare out again after braces. Read more...
Probably. As you have realized by age 35, this is not a self-correcting problem. If teeth don't look right (in you case, buck teeth), they don't fit right or function right. Can cause long-term wear and/or joint problems. Why don't you see a qualified orthodontic specialist. Initial exam is usually free or very small fee. Find out exactly what's wrong with your occlusion and what can be done to fix it. Read more...
Yes. The best way to correct flaring of the teeth is braces. If you are concerned about esthetics, see a dentist or an orthodontist for consultations. Read more...

My 6 year old daughter can't stop thumb sucking. Her teeth are not in allignment. What can be done? Please help. Thanks.

Thumbusters.com . This is a thumb "glove" or thumbuddytolove. Or you could try mavala stop (paint on bad taste) they all work differently, one may work for your child, good luck. Read more...
See a pedodontist. Thumb sucking should stop by age 2. After that, it does harm by moving the teeth and opening the bite. Also the jaw bones become malformed. Don't panic though because there is treatment . See your dentist. They will refer you to the proper specialists to stop the oral habit, orthodonticly move teeth to proper alignment. And the bone will be remolded to normal. Read more...

Can thumb sucking cause crooked teeth? My 3 year old still sucks her thumb, even though I've been trying to break the habit for 5 months now. I'm not sure, but it looks like her front middle teeth look slightly crooked and I was wondering if her thumb suc

Many . Many children suck their thumb or fingers until age 2 to 4 years old. If they continue sucking (to include a pacifier) once their permanent teeth come in, it can cause problems with how their teeth align. If a child sucks her thumb really hard it can also impact her baby teeth. Because you believe that your daughter may be experiencing an impact from her sucking; i suggest you have her see the dentist. Pedodontists are dentists who specialize in working with children. Good luck. Read more...
YES!! Thumb sucking causes a slew of dental problems. It changes the growth pattern of the upper jaw, flares the upper front teeth forward, pushes in the lower front teeth, and can lead to major dentoalveolar discrepancies between the upper and lower jaws. At age 3 it is not too late to work at stopping this habit before ramifications. By age 5, appliance therapy may be needed to stop the habit. Read more...
Absolutely. Unlike a pacifier that can be thrown away, a thumb is permanently available. Please gently try to discourage the habit, but remember for many kids it's a crutch, and kid's can't understand the down side. You may need help physically and psychologically if habit persists past beginning of eruption of the permanent teeth. Again, be gentle. Read more...

Should we be worrying that our four year old's thumb sucking is harming his teeth? Our son is still sucking his thumb at age four, and our attempts at weaning him off it have not been too successful. At what point do we need to worry that he's doing or is

Some . Some thumb habits are more harmfull than others. It depends on frequency, duration and force. Your 4 year old does not have any permanent teeth yet, but his habit can narrow his palate which will result in a malocclusion of both his baby teeth and his permanent teeth. Read more...
Well . Well this subject has been studied for years and the consensus is that it is better that the child not suck their fingers. Neither pacifiers or fingers do a child's teeth any good. The teeth are displaced and skeletal anomalies and misalignment of the the dental arcade results. We have been pandering to the psychologist who say that the child can be emotionally harmed by trying to prevent them from comforting their insecurity by suckling on something. The truth is that the damage is already done. They were weaned too early and not comforted to sleep at the breast when falling asleep would leave them contented and without anything to suck. I contend that finger sucking is a bad habit and should be discouraged. Tell them not to do it any more dr neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts. Read more...
Dilemma. Although it would be great to eliminate the habit, you can't force your son to quit. At age 4, he is still unable to rationalize cause and effect. Consequently, he cannot understand why you're asking him to give up something comforting and pleasurable. Perhaps, re-address this at age 7 with an outside "coach, " like a pediatric dentist or orthodontist. Read more...
Get help. As an orthodontist i'm called upon to rx distorted mouths due to pernicious digit habits. If your child kept hitting themselves over the head with a hammer, wouldn't you take the hammer away? If your child kept finding other objects to repeat this bad behavior, wouldn't you seek help finding out why, and what to do about it. Please get help now. Fixing the damage is no fun. Read more...

Child with twelve baby teeth orthodontist put braces no overbite, no thumb sucking or overcrowding and no chewing problems is this common for an orthodontist not to advise a parent that there child has 12 baby teeth paid $2500 to have baby teeth straighte

It . It is so difficult to advise you because i cannot examine your child. I'm assuming that your child had braces put on while he had a mixed dentition (baby teeth and permanent teeth). This is routine in orthodontic care. The orthodontist did not straighten the baby teeth, but rather aligned the permanent teeth that were in place when the treatment started. Now, as your child is a bit older and is starting to loose the rest of his baby teeth, there may be a need for further treatment. This is also common and acceptable. What concerns me is that you are not aware of what is going on. Nothing at all was discussed? Did you not realize that your child still had baby teeth? Were you referred to the orthodontist by your general dentist, or did you go on your own? Of course, everything should have been explained to you. Maybe you misunderstood what was explained? I cannot tell since i wasn't there. The fee you paid was not outrageous for phase one, and certainly too low for a full course of treatment. Did phase one turn out well? If so, it seems the only problem was a misunderstanding for the total fee, not the actual treatment that was done. I think you should have a sincere talk with the orthodontist and explain your concerns. Read more...
As . As an orthodontist, we do put braces on primary (baby) and permanent teeth between the ages of 7 and 11. This is called phase i or early preventative and interceptive orthodontic treatment (d8060 is the insurance code and yes runs between $2400 to $3200). Children with severe overbites, crowded teeth and crossbites benefit from early braces. An orthodontist will bracket a primary tooth to give extra stability to the wire. Sometimes placing braces on the primary teeth make the interceptive treatment more comfortable for the patient. It is expected that a permanent tooth may erupt under and resorbe (crack) a primary tooth during treatment. Approximately 70% of patients who undergo early treatment have severe enough maloclussions or bite problems that will require phase ii, however, not even the best orthodontist can predict that. You made the right decession to have phase i. Your child will benefit from possibly not needing extractions, prolonged treatment time in braces, the opportunity to have invisable braces in phase ii and even a chance not to require phase ii treatment. During your consult the orthodontist might have mentioned your options or they may be written down in the literature or information he discussed with you at the consult. I would recommend reading more information about orthodontic treatment on a few websites, or at aao.Com. Good luck. Lynann mastaj, dmd. Read more...
Not unusual. If twelve baby teeth, then also would have twelve permanent teeth. You went through the first phase of treatment and should expect a second phase of treatment after 28 permanent teeth are present after a "dental age" of 12 years. Ask your orthodontist for more explanation. Read more...
Not unusual. Your child is probably 8-10, and it is common to have 12 baby teeth and 12 permanent teeth. Your orthodontist probably started treatment for a good reason, which you may not fully understand (but is our job to educate why and when). It is a very common situation called phase i or early intervention orthodontics, and it will pave the way for a smoother precise finish at 12-14 with 28 teeth. Read more...
Too bad. Braces are for permanent teeth. We do orthodontic work while a child has baby teeth, but not braces. Typically we will work on jaw coordination, space issues, narrow jaws, and protrusive/retrusive lower jaws. Orthodontic appliances are used, not braces. Read more...
Communication. The key here is communication. It should be clear to you as to why orthodontic treatment was recommended as part of informed consent. Braces on permanent incisors with 12 baby teeth left is not uncommon and may be very important in certain situations. Time to visit with your orthodontist so you understand "why" in this child's situation. Read more...
Why? If 12 baby teeth are present, 12 permanent teeth are also present. Your orthodontist must have reason to do interceptive rx for your child. Please go back and ask for an explanation...I'm sure that this is a communication problem. Ask the orthodontist why phase i rx, what are the rx goals, and when will your child be ready for phase ii (full corrective) rx. Read more...
Talk to them. The goal of treating kids that age is not to straighten baby teeth, but to address structural issues with the jaw and bite. Teeth 'straightening' is done in later phases of treatment if they are required. You should have understood exactly what and why they were doing BEFORE you had your kid start treatment, but now that you have started, you still need to have a talk with them to understand. Read more...

Getting 1 upper wisdom tooth removed on friday. Problem is I have a thumb sucking habit. Is it best to refrain from this activity during this time?

Avoid any sucking. Anything that causes positive pressure like sucking through a straw is advised since it can loosen the clot protecting the extraction site. Other common precautions are to avoid vigorous activity, rinsing your mouth forcefully, and smoking. Try to limit sucking on your thumb at least for 48 hours. Read more...
Don't suck thumb. Thumb sucking can cause undue pressure on the clot in the extraction site and cause it to come out, resulting in a dry socket. So, yes, you should avoid this. I'm wondering what affect this habit has on the position of your front teeth? You should try to break this habit. You might need professional help for this, even an orthodontist can make a retainer to help you to break the habit.Good luck. Read more...

What dental problems can result from thumb-sucking?

None. None. Baby teeth fall out. New teeth replace them. If you are still doing it after your permanent teeth come in, then you might have bigger problems to worry about than just your teeth. Read more...
Open Bite... Bony malformation or an open bite may be caused by prolonged thumb sucking... This can result in mouth breathing. If at all possible, help your child to stop thumb sucking with a natural method. If necessary a dental appliance can be used to discourage thumb sucking. Read more...
Bite problems. Thumb sucking puts unusual press pressure on the upper and lower front teeth causing in some cases poor growth patterns that cannot be corrected with braces later on, but might need surgical correction. Read more...