What is the treatment for a herniated disc?

Depends. If you've done the physical therapy and no relief, then injections like epidural steroid injections or facet joint injections may be the next treatment options. There is growing evidence that stem cell therapies can also be helpful and heal tissues but are not covered by insurance at this time.
Varies. If just an incidental finding on a study with no symptoms, no treatment. For most others with symptoms, time is the best healer. Other treatment ranges from activity modification, medication, exercise, physical therapy, epidural steroid injections & where needed, lifestyle changes such as weight control & smoking cessation. 10% go onto surgery. There are few times when it is a surgical emergency.

Related Questions

What is a good treatment for herniated disc in back?

First, lifestyle . Changes in terms of not being a smoker, staying trim, regular exercise (emphasis on core strength ) & regular sleep habits. Most are treated non op with back support, pt, medication & pain management options which could include: epidural steroid injections, 90% are treated without surgery and if surgery is needed 95% success rate when leg pain worse than back pain and a nonsmoker. Read more...
Integrative care. A herniated disc can cause back pain as well as foot pain by physically pressing on the nerves that travel to the foot and by irritating them through the extrusion of pro-inflammatory disc materials. Physical therapy and other conservative measures, including medication management, are considered first line treatment. If these fail, your physician may recommend epidurals or surgery. Read more...

What is best medicine treatment for spinal herniated disc?

Usually NSAIDs. What level disc - cervical or lumbar? What are your symptoms, what did your physician find on the neurological examination? Any motor or sensory loss - see neurosurgeon asap. For sciatica or back pain only - first line of pharmacological treatment are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsaids). Read more...
Depends on symptoms. If no symptoms, do nothing. If mild symptoms anti-inflammatory medications work great (take with meals, and make sure you can take those -- clear with your primary care doctor). If symptoms is acute and very severe, you can get a Medrol (methylprednisolone) dose pack (oral steroids) which you take over 6 days... Ask you doctor to evaluate you first. You cannot have this if you have infection or brittle diabetic, etc.. Read more...

What is the best treatment for large left herniated disc L2 l3 and pain upon sitting or lying down.

Depends on pain. Most disc herniations heal with time. Depending on pain levels, medications like antiinflammatories and muscle relaxers are often helpful. If there is severe enough pain, an epidural injection may help. About 10% to 15% of patients need surgery. Read more...
Depends. Treatment for most herniations is based upon the degree of pain and disability the patient has and is done with the idea that about 90 percent can heal. Mild to moderate pain is treated with medications, rest, and possibly physical therapy or chiropractic. In severe cases, injection into the spine known as epidurals, or surgery is usually required. Thank you for your question. Read more...

What kind of treatment can I expect for a herniated disc at t7, and will I still be able to play football?

Herniated disc. Depends on the cause and severity of the herniated disc. Usually your doctor will recommend against playing football as your neck will be more suseptable to worsening injury. Read more...
Time. 90% of thoracic disc herniations require no treatment. Tincture of time will be the number one treatment. I noticed that you are listed as 46 years of age, so what type of football are you playing? If just flag or touch football, then you can return once your symptoms have improved, but do so gradually. Make sure you tolerate running, changing directions, catching passes, etc. Before competition. Read more...
Thoracic Disc. A thoracic disc herniation can have much more serious consequences than in the lumbar spine. The spinal canal is smaller and as a result spinal cord compression is much more of a concern as compared to nerve root issues in the lumbar spine. There are minimally invasive techniques for deompression but without specifics regarding your case it is hard to know the best treatment. See a neurosurgeon. Read more...