How do you get stomach cancer?

A serious disease. Stomach cancer is an abnormal growth of the lining of the stomach. It can cause pain and bleeding. If caught early, stomach cancer can be treated by surgically removing the cancer, along with some normal stomach. Stomach cancer can grow quite quickly and move to other organs, at which time it is usually incurable.
Many risks. Common causes and risk include high dietary use of salt-preserved and processed foods (as in japan), chronic infection with h. Pylori (stoamch ulcer causing bacteria), obesity, smoking, family history, pernicious anemia, and a hisory of gastric ulcers or gastric surgery.

Related Questions

How do you get rid of a stomach cancer?

Discuss with your MD. Depend on the type of cancer, the stage of cancer. If this is adenocarcinoma- in early stage-if possible, surgery will be the best treatment. Then if indicated followed by chemotherapy alone or chemo and radiation. Sometimes, chemotherapy is given prior to surgery in certain case. In advanced stage- chemotherapy will be the treatment. If this is lymphoma-treatment-is biological + chemotherapy. Read more...
Not easy. If localized, cancer may be removed in its entirety. However, many cancers spread to the local lymph nodes and to other organs quite early making curative resection impractical. Chemotherapy may help but is not curative. Read more...
Surgery. The more common form of stomach cancer, adenocarcinoma is usually treated with surgery if possible, followed sometimes by chemotherapy and radiation depending on pathology findings. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are also treated upfront with surgery if resectable. Lymphomas can also occur in stomach, and while surgery is sometimes utilized, primary chemotherapy and radiation therapy are options. Read more...

Do a lot of people get stomach cancer?

Stomach cancer. According to the world health organization, stomach cancer causes about 800, 000 deaths worldwide per year. If you think you have stomach cancer or have symptoms that concern you, you need to see a doctor. Read more...
Decreasing. Stomach cancer rates have been decreasing in the United States for many years. It is becoming less common, but is a very serious condition when it does occur. Read more...

Who is most likely to get stomach cancer?

Many risk factors. It is more common in men and those over 50 years old. A prior history of h. Pylori infection and non-white ancestry is also a risk. Diets rich in smoked meats & foods are risky (e.g. As in east asia). A family history of cancer or a prior history of stomach surgery and smoking is also risk inducing. Certain inherited syndromes also increase the risk (lynch syndrome, brca mutations). Read more...
Worldwide stomach Ca. Is more common and in japan, frequent enought towarrant endoscopic screening. Some thing japanese diet leads to this (and less breast cancer). Stomach cancer was more prominent with salted preservation rather than refrigeration, and antibiotic use. Poor nutrition, alcohol are factors in incidence. Read more...

Are men or women more likely to get stomach cancer?

Men. Men have twice the risk than women but certain lifestyle factors are probably at play too- obesity, dietary factors, smoking and drinking, etc. Read more...
Worldwide stomach Ca. Is more common and in japan, frequent enough to warrant endoscopic screening. Something japanese diet leads to this (and less breast cancer). Stomach cancer was more prominent with salted preservation rather than refrigeration, and antibiotic use. Poor nutrition, alcohol are factors in incidence. There does not appear to be a dominant defference between the sexes worldwide. Read more...

I think I might have stomach cancer! How would I get tested?

Unlikely. At your age (except in members of high risk families with certain 'cancer genes') but if you are truly concerned, visit your family doc and see if you can be refered to a gastroenterologist for a scope (egd). Read more...

Should everyone get a second opinion for a diagnosis of stomach cancer?

No. Regardless of the type of cancer, it is critical that every patient that requires surgery have a crystal-clear understanding of their treatment. As a cancer surgeon, i feel that communication is as important as the operation itself (and usually takes longer). If a patient is not comfortable with what they have heard, a second opinion from an independent doctor of the same specialty can be helpful. Read more...
Not necessarily. A second opinion can be a very useful visit, especially if you are not totally comfortable with your physician team. Stomach cancer is involved enough that even if you aren't getting a second opinion, you should meet with a surgeon and an oncologist. In most situations, these physicians work together to provide you the best care possible. Other specialists might also get involved with your care. Read more...

Do only old people get stomach cancer?

No. The age peak for stomach cancer is in the older population. However, younger individuals can be a t risk, especially if there is a strong family history of cnacer of the GI tract. Any persistent problem should be investigated. Read more...
No. Unusual in children, but there are several varieties so symptoms should be evaluated. Read more...

How typical is it for a 13 year old to get stomach cancer?

Absolutely not. Unfortunately, life is not fair, and strange and tragic disease processes can develop. But, teenagers rarely develop stomach cancer. Good luck. Read more...

Does celiac disease make it more likely that I'm going to get stomach cancer?

No. Celiac disease, especially if one has symptoms or small intestine inflammation/damage, does increase one's risk of small intestine cancer (adenocarcinoma, lymphoma). The increased risk may go to normal if one stays on a completely gluten free diet and stops having intestinal symptoms for many years. Celiac disease is not a risk factor for stomach cancer, according to the american cancer society. Read more...
Not stomach cancer . Individuals with celiac disease are more likely to have diabetes, thyroid problems, and other autoimmune problems in the GI tract like the liver. Rather than stomach cancer, the usual cancer that is found is non-hodgkin's lymphoma a tumor in the lymph nodes. Read more...