Are febrile seizures considered brain injury?

Not usually. These are not entirely uncommon before age 5 when the brain is not very mature and has less ability to suppress excess electrical activity inside the brain. The further it is after that age, it is much more important to bring this to medical or neurological attention. A few early febrile seizures before age 5 usually would not be associated with any significant brain injury or findings.
No. Febrile seizures are related to a developmental abnormality of the brain, usually inherited in children between 6 months and 6 years of age. Simple febrile seizures are considered a benign occurrence.
Not Really. Altho not everyone will have a febrile seizure, so there must be a predisposing situation, they appear to cause absolutely no permanant harm. So no injury, .

Related Questions

Can febrile seizures cause permanent brain damage?

Usually not. To call the seizure as a febrile seizure, the age of the child should be between 6 mo and 6 yrs, the seizure should be associated with the sudden raise of high temp, the sizure should be generalized and less than 15 mins, even if it is prolonged and it was purely a febrile seizure, it does not cause permanent brain injury. Read more...
By definition-no. The problem in infancy is separating out the ones that have a seizure disorder that became evident during an event, or an event that was a simple febrile seizure. Febrile seizures by definition are relatively brief, come on in a defined fashion, and do not involve any interference with providing oxygen to the brain. If they have a bad seizure & get brain damage, it is a seizure disorder. Read more...

Can febrile seizures cause permanent brain damage in a person?

Definition issue. By definition, febrile seizures are considered benign, lasting only minutes & not leading to respiratory compromise. As long as the brain & heart get oxygen, the chances of death or disability is remote & kids outgrow them. However, some kids with epilepsy will have a seizure with a fever, & carry a fsz label but go on to have major seizures with damage as they get older. Read more...

If you had febrile seizures when you were young, could it caused brain damage?

Not by definition. Febrile seizures are common:1/20 kids 6m-6yr. By definition the term is applied to seizures not thought to be triggered by or cause brain injury.Whether brief or longer, the label was seldom used if the kids seizure resulted in impairment of oxygen flow to the brain which would be the main cause of injury.The seizure itself did not.Problems come if true epilepsy emerges in young kids & confuses us. Read more...

If you had febrile seizures when you were young, does that mean you've suffered brain damage?

No. Febrile seizures reflect a tendency for the immature nervous system 6m-6yr to have a brief seizure with the sudden stress of a rapid rise in body temperature.Most definitions of fs exclude those that have any interference with the breathing mechanism that might produce oxygen deprivation.A true seizure disorder (epilepsy) can have seizures during fever but the process & issues are different. Read more...

Can febrile seizures be the cause of permanent brain damage or be fatal?

Benign by definition. It is good to point out a difference here between a seizure occurring with a fever & a "febrile seizure". Anyone with a variety of different types of seizures can have a major seizure during a fever.The outcome of this is related to the type of seizure & complications common to that type. Febrile seizures are by definition, brief, don't impair oxygenation or result in long term injury. Read more...
Not likely. simple febrile seizures are not associated with brain injury. What is known as complex febrile seizure is actually a form of epilepsy that is triggered by fever. What is often thought of as brain damage from a prolonged seizure is more likely to be due to the cause of the fever, for instance encephalitis, meningitis. Read more...

Hello, in a surgery to remove tonsils, is there any risk such as brain damage during general anaesthesia if my 5 yr boy has had febrile seizures?

Unlikely. I am not an anesthesiologist but a problem with seizure activity is very unlikely. Remember that general anesthesia represents a very high level of sedation. This reduces brain activity and in general makes seizure less likely to occur. Febrile seizures are different from other forms of seizure and in this instance in particular there should not be an increase in risk. Read more...
Surgery and seizures. You can get fevers of up to 101-102 after (not during) any surgery for a few days. Any higher than that and you need to have your child assessed as there could be another cause such as pneumonia or flu. It's crucial to keep predisposed children hydrated after tonsillectomy. Treat fevers with medicines your ENT says to take. Surgery & anesthesia are usually safe with appropriate precautions. Read more...
No additional risk. A history of febrile seizures does not increase anesthesia risk. Read more...
Minimal. While there is always a risk from anesthesia that risk is very small. Febrile seizures should not increase that risk. Please ask your anesthesiologist about this topic to allay your concerns. Read more...
Risks. Discuss with the anesthesiologist. This should not be an issue. Read more...
Tonsillectomy. By the time most children reach five years of age they have outgrown febrile seizures and should not be aproblem for your child to have surgery for his tonsils. Read more...
No: Febrile seizures only happen with fever, and no one is going to do elective surgery while fever is present. Read more...
T&A. General anesthesia is about the best anti seizure medication available. If the anesthesia is handled appropriately, there should be no seizure activity. Read more...

Could possibly a febrile seizure mess up your brain?

NO. Normal infants who get ill with fever and show a toxic state may demonstrate a seizure like behavior. This is a reaction to the toxic reaction to the infection. The body then recovers, and the child is normal. If there is another problem involved - strong family history of epilepsy, or serious pre-existing disorder of the brain - then the seizure may represent a more serious problem. Read more...
Not likely. Simple febrile seizures are brief and are not associated with brain damage. Complex febrile seizures, or what in the past was called epileptic seizures precipitated by fever, can be long in duration. damage, if it occurs is usually due to what triggered the seizure, not the seizure itself. for instance seizure in a child who has meningitis. Read more...