What is surgery like for non small cell lung cancer?

Often cures. Surgery is the standard of care for stage i and ii lung cancer in the physically fit patient, and should be considered as an option in many patients with stage iiia. Often can be done minimally invasively thorascopically or with a robot. Recovery varies with the level of invasiveness. Lung surgery has best outcomes by a board certified thoracic surgeon.
See below. Depending on where the cancer is and how big, it may require resection of a lobe (part of the lung) or the whole lung. Many surgeons may do this thoracoscopically if feasible, which is less invasive and allows for a faster recovery. Generally, patients spend several days in the hospital with chest tubes, which are painful, and recover over the next 3 months or so if there are no complications.

Related Questions

Could my 87 year old father have cataract surgery when he has stage 3 small cell lung cancer?

Yes. As in anyone considering any procedure, the benefits of having the treatment must be greater than the accepted risk, of course. In your father's situation, one condition does not exclude the other. Read more...
Yes. This decision hinges on balancing the potential benefit of the surgery and your father's quality of life. If cataracts are mild, and he is not significantly hampered, i'd likely advise deferring surgery. If vision changes are severe and quality of life is significantly affected, it is not unreasonable. The decision should be made in concert with your father's oncologist to help clarify. Read more...

Does it make sense for my 87-year-old father to have cataract surgery when he has stage 3 small cell lung cancer?

It depends. If he has responded to treatment and is doing well and the symptoms of the cataract are impairing his daily activites, it could be considered. If he is not responding to treatment and his condition is deteriorating then it doesnt make sense. Read more...
Patient dependent. If his quality of life is affected significantly due to poor vision from a cataract, and he has good potential vision after the cataract is removed, then the risk/benefit ratio is likely in favor of having the cataract surgery done. Cancer prognosis is hard to predict, and cataract surgery is lower risk in terms of medical problems. Read more...
Yes, it does. To be able to see things clearly is part of quality of life. If he has a poor vision due to his cataract and cataract surgery can fix it- absolutely it is a good thing to do, if that can be done safely. The surgery itself is minor and with very minimal side effects. The fear of falling will increase significantly when we are older and it'd be very helpful if at least we can see things clearly. Read more...

What are the tests for non-small cell lung cancer?

Work Up. Includes: ct-chest thru liver and adrenals, head ct+/- contrast or mr, bone scan. Pet scan depends on ct findings, proximity of primary to medistinum. Read more...
Nsclc. First of all, a biopsy will need to be done to the lung mass/nodule not only to establish diagnosis but also to find the histology and genetic profile of the cancer. Then, complete staging work-up with pet/ ct scan need to be done to stage the cancer. The treatment will depend on the histology/molecular-genetic mutation status, stage, as well as overall condition and preference of a patient. Read more...
A few. Ct scan and pet scan are sensitive radiographic test. Percutaneous biopsy can provide a diagnosis. In some high risk patients with suspicious radiographs going straight to surgical resection is reasonable. Read more...

What's the prognosis for non small cell lung cancer?

5yr suvival bystage . Ia = 49% ib = 45% iia = 30% iib = 31% iiia = 14% iiib = 5% iv = 1% http://www.Cancer.Org/cancer/lungcancer-non-smallcell/detailedguide/non-small-cell-lung-cancer-survival-rates. Read more...
Stage. As noted by other physician, there are statistical based survival estimates by stage. But, each patient is an individual. It is most critical to speak with your cancer team. They will develop multi-disciplan approach and treatment plan and have a more personalized/individualized determination of reasonable prognosis. Read more...
See below. No way to say based on the your question. We would need to know what stage, molecular markers, what type, etc. Read more...

Could you explain what is non small cell lung cancer?

One type of lung. Cancer. It is not easy to explain. There are multiple subtypes within in this type. These are due to smoking and tend to spread locally as compared to early spread through blood for small cell cancer. See this site for more info. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/non-small-cell-lung/patient/page1. Read more...
Classification. Lung cancer can be classified into two broad classes: small cell and non- small cell. Since small cell is almost always non- surgical, it is important to make the distinction. Non- small cell can include squamous cell, adenocarcinoma, large cell, neuroendocrine, broncho-alveolar, etc. Read more...

What is the survival percentage non small cell lung cancer?

The survival for. All lung cancer is about 14%. A useless figure. You need to know size, nodal involvement, resectability. The percentage rises as you select. But it still is only 80% with resection and small squamous cancers. Read more...
The stage and others. Will depend on the stage and other prognostic factors. In general, the 5 year overall survival for stage 1 is 60-80%., stage 2 is 40-50%; stage 3 is 10-23%, and stage 4 is less than 10%. These however are the statistics obtained when using regular cytotoxic chemotherapy. With more personalized and more targetted therapy-we are hoping the number will improve. Read more...
Stage dependent. Each patient and each case is individual. Key to good cancer care is a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach. If indicated, surgical resection should be performed by a thoracic surgeon. Here is generalized statistical estimate by stage: http://goo.Gl/2cdq9. Read more...

What are the surgical options for non-small cell lung cancer?

Surgery for NSCLC. Curative surgery for lung cancer is based currently on lobectomy, or removing the entire lobe (1/5 of the lung), and rarely pneumonectomy, or removing an entire lung on one side. Lobectomy is traditionally done via a thoracotomy (-cotomy meaning cut, or cut the thorax or chest). Now there are minimally invasive approaches. This is called video assisted thoracic surgery or vats lobectomy. Read more...
The first question. Should be is there any role for surgery. The techniques are "open" or thoracoscopic directed, originally just video, now robotic as well. The surgeon should know status of n-2 nodes and whether a lobectomy or entire lung is to be removed, and usually nodes are dissected or sampled regardless ot pre-op "knowledge". Segments and wedge done for poor pft. Read more...
Robot or VATS. Optimal lung cancer surgery, in appropriate candidates, is anatomic lobectomy (part of lung) or pneumonectomy (whole lung). Complete lymph node sample or dissection is integral part of case. Traditional centers use thoracotomy as primary approach. Modern minimally invasive approaches include vats and robotic techniques. Optimal lung cancer treatment is by comprehensive multidisciplinary approach. Read more...

How likely is survival of non small cell lung cancer when diagnosed at stage 3 b?

About 30% at 5yrs. Stage 3b is a complicated stage of lung ca with patients having a variety of sizes of tumors and involvement of the chest outside the lungs. Treatment is usually chemotherapy +/- radiation therapy. About 30-35% of patients will survive past 5 yrs. Read more...