How aggressive is kidney cancer?

Aggressive. Kidney cancer is generally aggressive. There are varying degrees of aggressiveness which is determined by biopsy after the kidney is removed. Untreated aggressive kidney cancer is usually fatal. The treatment of choice is surgery.
Depends. Most kidney tumors i see in my practice are low to medium grade. If diagnosed when small, there is good chance of cure. Some very exciting new drugs have been approved for kidney cancers in the past few years.

Related Questions

Is kidney cancer lethal?

Yes. In general, kidney cancer is a lethal cancer. However, depending on various factors, it may not be lethal. Factors such as the patients age, the aggressiveness of the tumor, and size of the tumor are all important factors. However, kidney cancer overall has a very poor prognosis once it has metastasized. Read more...
Kidney cancer. By definition, any cancer is potentially lethal. When kidney cancer is detected in the earlier stages (before metastasis outside the kidney) it is often curable by surgery. Metastatic kidney cancer, however, has a very poor prognosis. Read more...

Is kidney cancer hereditary?

Can be. Certain hereditary syndromes including von hippel lindau, birt-hogg dube syndrome for example, increase risk of kidney cancer. These syndromes typically have other manifestations as well. However, the vast majority of kidney cancer is sporadic. Read more...
Sometimes. The vast majority of kidney cancer cases are not inherited (sporadic). There are a handful of syndromes known to be associated with different types of kidney cancer but they are rare. A well known example is von hippel-lindau syndrome. Read more...

How common is kidney cancer?

Not common. Kidney cancer is not common, however the incidence is rising with the use of modern radiologic imaging, including ct scans. Read more...
Relatively uncommon. Kidney cancer is the sixth and eighth leading cause of new cancers in men and women in 2012, respectively. An estimated 40, 250 cases in men and 24, 520 in women are projected in 2012, which represents 5% and 3% of new cancer diagnoses for men and women, respectively. Read more...

How did I get kidney cancer?

Difficult to be sure. Most kidney cancers are sporadic, meaning there is no inherited cause, though there are a number of familial syndromes associated with it. Multiple factors including environmental exposures and possibly diet smoking and obesity can lead to genetic mutations in kidney cells which if not properly repaired can lead to uncontrolled growth sometimes with the ability to spread far from the kidney. Read more...

How is kidney cancer treated?

Kidney Cancer. Patient should be evaluated by urologist oncologist to secede whether this patient can have radical resection of the kidney in order to give the patient a good chance for cure. If the patient is not eligible for surgery than can be treated with sunitinib which is an oral drug, or temsirolimus which is an IV drug. There are several other drugs available to help and support this patient if thes. Read more...
Usually surgery. Kidney cancer is primarily treated with surgery if the cancer is confined to the kidney. Depending on the size/location of the tumor, partial removal (called partial nephrectomy) of just the tumor portion of the kidney is recommended. The majority is treated minimally invasive techniques including laparoscopic/robotic-assisted surgery. Cancer spread from kidney may be treated with chemotherapy. Read more...

How can I treat kidney cancer?

Typically surgery. Kidney cancer is primarily treated with surgery if the cancer is confined to the kidney. Depending on the size/location of the tumor, partial removal (called partial nephrectomy) of just the tumor portion of the kidney is recommended. The majority is treated minimally invasive techniques including laparoscopic/robotic-assisted surgery. Cancer spread from kidney may be treated with chemotherapy. Read more...
Oncologist&urologist. If the cancer is contained in the kidney and no other problems that prevent surgery to be done- surgery is the best treatment -either partial or total nephrectomy ( depend on size/location). If the cancer has spread - oral targeted/systemic therapy will be the standard of care- i.e. Sunitinib/pazopanib etc. Debulking surgery sometimes is also done-in certain metastatic setting. See your doctor. Read more...
Surgery or ChemoRad. The most common treatment for kidney cancer that has not spread is surgery to remove the kidney (a nephrectomy). If the tumor is small enough, it could be done by removing part of the kidney to preserve some kidney function on that side (a partial nephrectomy). These surgeries can be done open, laparoscopic, or robotic-assisted laparoscopic. Cancers that have spread require chemo and/or radiation. Read more...
Surgery or ChemoRad. The most common treatment for kidney cancer that has not spread is surgery to remove the kidney (a nephrectomy). If the tumor is small enough, it could be done by removing part of the kidney to preserve some kidney function on that side (a partial nephrectomy). These surgeries can be done open, laparoscopic, or robotic-assisted laparoscopic. Cancers that have spread require chemo and/or radiation. Read more...

How is kidney cancer diagnosed?

X-rays. Kidney cancer, when suspected, is primarily diagnosed with imaging studies. These tests include kidney ultrasound, ct scans, and mri. A kidney biopsy is rarely indicated as the diagnosis can usually be made with these imaging studies. Special urine may also be performed as an adjunct to x-rays for certain types of kidney cancers. Read more...
Usually ct. True diagnosis is with biopsy or surgery....N but most rumors found with ct. Read more...
Primarily imaging. Most kidney cancers are found through some type of imaging modality (e.g. Ct scan, mri, etc), although some can be picked up through looking at the cells present in a urine sample. Read more...

What are cause of kidney cancer?

Kidney cancer. You should see your urologist and also look at nccn.Org but smoking. About a third of kidney cancers are thought to be caused by smoking. Some of the chemicals from tobacco get into the body and are passed out in urine. These chemicals in the urine can be damaging (carcinogenic) to kidney tubule cells. Other chemical carcinogens. Some workplace chemicals have been linked to an increased risk. Read more...