Can cyberknife surgery be used for lung cancer?

Yes. Results with cyberknife surgery for early stage lung cancer are similar to surgery and it is used commonly in people who are elderly or can not undergo surgery. In certain cases, cyberknife is used for cancer spreading to the brain.
Yes, depends . Yes is the short answer. It does not provide pathology. Usually in early stage disease by itself or in combination with other radiation modalities in advance stage. In very young with good pulmonary function still not the standard of care. In elderly with poor pulmonary function we use it often. There is a randomized trial between surgery and radiosurgery that is accruing now.
Yes. Yes. Cyberknife = focused radiation treatment can treat lung cancer. Ongoing studies are characterizing it versus surgery. However, it is often used in patients that are not fit enough to undergo surgery.
Absolutely. Lung cancer is actually the number one reason that patients come to our cyberknife center (oklahomack.Com). Cyberknife was invented with lung tumors in mind, since one of its biggest advantages over older types of radiosurgery is its ability to follow tumors that move during treatment (like lung tumors).

Related Questions

What is surgery like for non small cell lung cancer?

Often cures. Surgery is the standard of care for stage i and ii lung cancer in the physically fit patient, and should be considered as an option in many patients with stage iiia. Often can be done minimally invasively thorascopically or with a robot. Recovery varies with the level of invasiveness. Lung surgery has best outcomes by a board certified thoracic surgeon. Read more...
See below. Depending on where the cancer is and how big, it may require resection of a lobe (part of the lung) or the whole lung. Many surgeons may do this thoracoscopically if feasible, which is less invasive and allows for a faster recovery. Generally, patients spend several days in the hospital with chest tubes, which are painful, and recover over the next 3 months or so if there are no complications. Read more...

What can I do to control my pain after lung cancer surgery?

Many things. We have many medicines and approaches to managing pain. The best approach for you will depend on the type of pain you have and its severity. There is no "one size fits all" approach to pain management. You need to discuss the type of pain and severity of it with your physician. Read more...
Be active. The most important thing you can do is to be as active as you can! use the little breathing exercise tool (voldyne) they gave as often as you can, take your pain medicine as prescribed and be active. You should feel much better after a couple weeks and fully recovered after 4-6 weeks. If you are still having pain beyond that, you need to see your doctor to determine if there is something wrong! Read more...

Is it possible to cure lung cancer without surgery or chemo?

Yes. Early stage lung cancer can be cured with surgery only (resection of the cancer). Read more...
Surgery Standard. Surgery is the standard of care for the treatment of stage i and ii lung cancer. Read more...
Likely yes, but wait. A lot depends on the size lack of nodes +, and location, but surgery is still the established treatment for this. Once nodes are involved, chemo is needed. Stereosotactic radiosurgery-srs can control 90+% of small lesions. Many focus on the equipment, controlling motion, but the consept is many beams focused on a target cancer delivering very high doses each day for 3-5 days. Get more info. Read more...

What is the rate of recurrence after successful lung cancer surgery?

Depends on stage. Recurrence rates are dependent on the stage of lung cancer that a patient is having surgery for. Stage i lung cancer has low recurrence rates, stage ii less than iii and iii the highest. Most recurrences happen in the first 3 years after surgery. Therefore a patient should be in a radiographic surveillance program after surgery. A tumor found after 5 years is probably a brand new lung cancer. Read more...
Too high. For comfort! rates apply to groups. Even 1 node positive drops the cure rate below 50-60%. The finer you select for smaller lesions and squamous histology, the rate may be as high as 80%. We have worked to select the best treatment and better treatment ffor years, but the ace of progress is slow. This is why we urge never starting to smoke, and stopping now if you do. Read more...

Help please? How long will a person have lung pain after lung cancer surgery?

Not at all. Pain is due to incisions, not the lung, which really has no feeling. In some patients, some degree of incisional pain can persist for months. Read more...

How effective is video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for treating lung cancer?

Experienced. In an experienced surgeons hands with an appropriate lesion thoracoscopic surgery can be very successful in treating lung cancer. Need to seek out person with extensive experience and proven judgement regarding lung cancer treatment with this modality. Good luck! Read more...

Why does stage 2 lung cancer after cancer has been removed with surgery still have a poor prognosis?

Guarded, not poor. Tiny groups of cancer cells have often spread -- but they often haven't. Some cancers are better at early spreading than others. The pathologist can help your doctor estimate the odds. Read more...

Can I have another surgery if my lung cancer comes back?

It depends. It depends on multiple factors: the type of surgery you had originally; is it a recurrence of the original cancer; or is it a second lung cancer. The best thing to do is talk to your surgeon, and have your case discussed in a multidisciplinary group with surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists, pathologists and radiologists. Read more...
Depends . It is very important to determine if the cancer is new of recurrence from the previous one! repeat surgery is more difficult and riskier, whether it on the same or the opposite lung! there are many factors that have to be considered! you need to discuss your options with a thoracic surgeon and oncologist. Read more...
Possibly. Although recurrent cancer is less likely to be localized and therefore amenable to surgery. If it is a new cancer though, surgery may be an option based on your pulmonary function and the stage of the new cancer. Read more...