Does Mederma work well on acne scars and age spots?

Mederma won't work. Mederma can be helpful for surgical or traumatic wounds during the healing period. Once scars have matured it is unlikely that mederma will result in any improvement.
Doubtful. Feel free to try mederma for acne scars and age spots, but there is little in the composition of mederma that does better on scars than topical silicone gel and on age spots than topical hydroquinone. Both of these problems can be even more effectively treated with dermarolling and/or laser treatments.

Related Questions

La mer, mederma, massages, and nothing seems to work for acne scars. Would a laser treatment work?

Acne scars are tough. There are a lot of options available to improve acne scarring. The proper treatment depends upon the severity of the scarring. Topical creams and ointments are not usually helpful. Non-invasive lasers help with very superficial scarring, more invasive lasers are better for moderate scarring, and both dermabrasion and surgical excision are best for more severe scarring. Read more...
Fractionated laser . One of the best treatments for acne scarring is fractionated laser. Depending on your skin color, texture and extent of scarring there are different laser options out there. A non-ablative fractionated laser like the fraxel re:store or dual has no real downtime, but requires multiple treatments. A fractionated co2 laser is more aggressive with about a week downtime, but may give faster results. Read more...

Can Mederma works on acne scars?

Forget it. This is a cover-up based on a gimmicky onion formula. I'm really sorry that your acne was neglected and you ended up with scars. If you want something that works, you'll need to get with a plastic surgeon or dermatologist who can use a laser, filler or microsurgery. Read more...

Does Mederma get rid or reduce the appearance of acne scars as it says?

It might. Scars are part of normal healing and progress through stages. Treatment with moisturizing agents, massage, and pressure, can help the scar to progress to its quiescent stage. At maturity, the scar will be flat, white, and soft. Acne scars are particularly difficult to hide or improve. Many techniques exist, because none work 100% of the time. See a dermatologist, or plastic surgeon for advice. Read more...
Scar treatment. Over the counter scar remedies can help soften and reduce appearance of scars. There is nothing that erases a scar. No laser, no cream, no surgery... All of these can only "improve" the appearance of a scar. If the scars are significant and deep, i would recommend seeking out the advise of a board certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon in your area. Read more...

Would Mederma be effective for fading the redness of an acne scar? Just the discoloration of the scar, would it be helpful?

Mederma. No good scientific studies show benefit from mederma. I don't recommend it to my patients. Redness from inflammation or scar healing will go away on its own as long as the source of inflammation is gone. I recommend sun block for acute redness to prevent permanent discoloration. Bleaching creams or lasers can be used for chronic discoloration. Best to ask your dermatologist or plastic surgeon. Read more...
Reducing Acne Scars. Hello, there are a number of ways to minimize the appearance of mild acne scars. Mederma is an over the counter scar treatment, but there are many others, including prescription treaments. If the scars are severe, you may also benefit from dermabrasion or dermaplaning, which are outpatient procedures used to treat deep acne scars. Read more...
Yes. But you have to use it 4 times a day for months or don't bother. Wash the skin with a gentle soap, pat dry and rub a tiny amount of gel into the area. If it "pills", you are using too much and wasting it. I like to have patients use a similar priced, silicone gel like nugel which only has to be used twice a day. You an get vascular laser or ipl treatments for the redness too. They help a lot! Read more...

What's best for acne scars... OTC creams like Mederma or scarfade, or RX like tretinions?

Scar improvement. Scar improvement can be achieved, but it takes patience. An overnight improvement is simply impossible. There is no clinical evidence to support Mederma. You need a long peel. This is achieved with tretinoins. Also, microdermabrasion and/or dermabrasion depending on scar depth. A chemical peel is also an otpion, Tretinoins, abrasions, and peels all achieve the desired skin slough. Good luck. Read more...

I have acne scar but they are not deep they are on the surface is there an cream that can help lighten it? Like Mederma

Not a fan of Mederma. I am not a big advocate of mederma. The active ingredient is allium cepa (onion extract) and there is weak evidence to suggest that this is beneficial but the research behind medierma is some what not convincing. While it will not hurt unless you have a topical allergic reaction, it probably will not help. You are better off to try silastic sheeting or silicone gel + sunblock. Read more...

Does Mederma clog pores? I want to use it for acne scars and I don't want it to clog and cause more pimples. Thanks!

No but. No. But don't expect much. The differin (adapalene) will do much more for you. You don't need to complicate things or waste money on this borderline product. Control the acne & your skin will slowly heal very well. Read more...
It's not really. The best product for acne scars. Best to see your local dermatologist for recommendations. Read more...

Can you tell me if I use Mederma on my face for acne scars will it make my face itchy red and iritated?

See below. Use of me derma on acne will lead to redness and irritation. Proper treatment is needed for acne. Read more...
Usually not. Me-derma and silicone gel applications are usually soothing due to increased moisture retained at site. The sites do have to be cleaned prior to application however. It may help decrease the redness of the acne scar sites, but will not do anything to reduce or remove them. Often used after facial surgery to reduce noticeability of scarring. Read more...