Can anemia be associated with peripheral vascular disease pvd?

Not usually. Peripheral vascular disease is most commonly caused by hardening of the arteries from cholesterol deposits and that shouldn't cause anemia. There are a few unusual causes of peripheral vascular problems from rheumatologic diseases which can be associated with anemia but even if you have both, more common causes of anemia need to be ruled out before assuming they are related.

Related Questions

Is hypoxemia associated with peripheral vascular disease?

No. Hypoxemia is low oxygen in blood. Pvd is a mechanical problem and doesn't effect the actual level of oxygen. Lung function effect the blood oxygen level. Read more...

Are femoral bruits associated with peripheral vascular disease?

Often they are. A bruit is a noise that is heard with a stethoscope reflecting turbulent flow. IT can be a normal finding and is non specific. It is often associated with narrowing of arteries, however that is unlikely in a 33 year old. THe pest way to tell if you have "PVD" is to have a physician measure the pressure in your feet and calculate an "ABI" (foot pressure/arm pressure) value of 0.9 or more is normal. Read more...

What to do if I have severe peripheral vascular disease?

First consult. A vascular surgeon, who is a specialist in this disorder. He can offer arterial reconstruction or stenting, if your condition is severe. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: peripheral vascular disease?

Vascular disease. Peripheral vascular disease (pvd), peripheral arterial disease (pad) or peripheral artery occlusive disease (paod), refers to the obstruction of large arteries not close to the heart or brain. Most commonly it affects the lower aorta and lower extemities (thighs, legs and feet) but can also affect the arms. Read more...
Arterial disease . Pvd is commonly obstuctive arterial disease in the limbs ( not in the head or heart) in a broad description, veins might be included and so could aneurysms and some other medical conditions. Read more...
Depends. Pvd is a catch-all term that may indicate venous or arterial dz. Usually docs use this term to indicate blockages(plaque buildup) in the arteries. However, some docs refer to swelling and discoloration as PVD as well. Read more...

How is smoking related to peripheral vascular disease?

What type? Nf-1 has classic skin manifestations - one just examines skin to see if criteria for the number/size of nevi and ash-leaf spots on the skin are seen. Read more...
Damages vessels. Smoking directly damages the blood vessel walls, causing blockages. Read more...

How are arteriosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease different?

PVD/PAD/atherosclero. Pvd/pad/atherosclerosis are one in the same. Plaque causes stenosis of arteries. Plaque can be soft or heavily calcified. Board certified surgeons should be able to offer you the best treatment options depending on location, quality of symptoms and co-morbidities. Vascular surgeon can offer all therapies including endovascular, open and medical modalities. Read more...
Can be same. Arteriosclerosis, also known as atherosclerosis, is development of plaque build-up inside of arteries that leads to narrowing or occlusions of arteries. This decreases blood flow & oxygen to organs & tissues. It is known in lay terms as "hardening of the arteries". This is one of many forms of peripheral vascular disease. Others include dissections, clotting, venous insufficiency, leg aneurysms. Read more...

Are diabetics more prone to peripheral vascular disease? Why?

Yes, vascular risks. People with type 2 diabetes not only have high sugars, but also likely have the Insulin resistance syndrome, including high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL chol, increased tendency to clot, increased inflammation. All of these factors promote atherogenic (plaque) disease in blood vessels, leading to higher risk of stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary heart disease. Read more...
Inflammation . Diabetes increases inflammation of the blood vessels which accelerates the formation of plaque. This progresses even faster if diabetics smoke. Diabetics with pad are at risk for amputation more than other patients. If there are symptoms patients should be checked for pad. Pad is also a marker for patients with underlying disease of the blood vessels of the heart and neck. Read more...

Is peripheral vascular disease the same thing as hypertension?

No. Hypertension is a sustained elevation in one's blood pressure. Peripheral vascular disease is when you develop plaques in the peripheral arteries that can progress to blockages. Read more...
No. Hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure. This can contribute to a different problem- peripheral vascular disease (otherwise known as pad, "hardening of the arteries, " atherosclerosis, and other names). Read more...