How are social class and dental caries related?

Differnet levels. Ther eis a theory since poorer people eat a high carbohydrate diet they are more prone to dental disease. More fast food and high sugar foods are eaten in lower social class people.
Money, money...money. Lower social class usually implies less income, and less income GREATLY limits regular evaluations by a Dentist. Hence cavities can be a problem in this group; but actually cavities can be a problem for even some College professors and hospital doctors.
Diet. This is a generalization. Some social classes have diets that are high in carbohydrates (sugars). Access to care as well as making dental health a priority are also factors.

Related Questions

In the classification of dental caries, what class is the caries located on the middle third of anterior teeth?

Class 3. Class 1 - single surface on posterior teeth. Class 2 - involves an inter proximal surface on a posterior tooth. Class 3 - involves an inter proximal surface of an anterior tooth (usually in the middle or incisal third). Class 4 - involves the incisal edge of an anterior tooth. Class 5 - cavity along the gum line. Read more...
One more Class... Class vi - cusp tip caries the doc above is right on, but i thought i'd add class vi for thoroughness. Read more...

Do vegans suffer from dental caries?

Yes. Yes, vegans can suffer from dental caries, especially if they eat lots of dried fruits. Vegans tend to eat more wheat, rye and other carbohydrates which break down into sugars when eaten. However, as with any diet, proper dental hygiene and drinking plenty of water daily can prevent dental caries. Read more...
They can. Vegans do suffer from dental caries just as much as the population at large if they consume fermentable carbohydrates such as sugar and flour. The bacteria in the mouth consume carbohydrates left on the teeth and produce dental plaque. The byproduct of this is plaque acid which demineralized enamel causing cavities. The recipe for cavities is teeth, combined with bacteria, and fermentable carbs. Read more...
Yes. Vegan or not... The streptococcus bacteria is causal in dental caries. Drinking something as healthy sounding as carrot juice before bed can be a cause of cavities. Could also be food caught between your teeth which did not get removed... I suggest using an oral irrigator like water pik or hydrofloss to make sure that food particles are not causing you dental caries.. Read more...
Yes. Vegans can actually have higher rates of caries because their diets contain a lot more carbohydrates which the oral bacteria use to produce acids which in turn help to cuase caires. Read more...
Vegan diets. I agree with the previous answers regarding carbohydrates and decay. Beware many fruits and veggies are acidic which can contribute to decay and erosion. Read more...
Hygiene. Either way, vegan or not, people who do not practice proper oral hygiene and not getting to a dentist will have the same chance of getting dental caries. Read more...
Yes. No immunity from vegan diet. Just the opposite. Vegan diet supplies sugars/starches easily converted into acids. Read more...

What are some symptoms of dental caries?

Early. Early caries sometimes present with sensitivity/pain to sweet .As the lesions progress thermal changes will often cause pain (more often cold). Bad breath can also be due to dental caries. Read more...
Could be no symptoms. Some cavities present with no symptoms. Even if the tooth shows no symptoms, a dark color or a change in the reflection of light could clue you in to the presence of a cavity. Read more...
Pain, sensitivity... Cavities in the early stages are painless, but as they get bigger and deeper they get into the part of the hard organic tooth tissue called dentin with nerves. While each individual is different, temperature, sugar, salt, sweets, pressure could all set off a pain response. If the decays get into the soft tissue of the tooth, the pain can become extreme and worse if infection sets in! Get it fixed . Read more...

Could you tell me what are dental caries?

Cavities. Cavities... They key is preventing them thru great oral health care. In today's world with all we know they are mostly preventible. It would be awesome if parent made a commitment to zero cavities for their children and worked closely with their dentist to accomplish that. Save time, money and pain & avoid fillings, crowns, root canals, abscess and extractions. Read more...
Dental Caries. Dental caries, also called tooth decay, is when the tooth enamel & dentin get destroyed by the acid produced by our oral bacteria plaque during their digestion of the sugars (carbohydrates) in our food. It is so important to reduce the prolong exposure to sugars & maintain a reduce level of bacteria in our mouth by the good habit of brushing and flossing twice daily, specially at bedtime. Read more...
Tooth Destroyer. An infectious and transmissible disease resulting from certain types of bacteria present in the mouth. This combined with the absence of saliva and poor dietary habits leads to further disease progression. It can be prevented by changing the balance of power between the risk factors and the protective factors of good saliva flow, dental sealants, effective diet and improved dental home care. Read more...

What can one do to correct dental caries?

Depends. If at all possible have the caries removed and the tooth filled but only after assessing the periodontal health of the teeth.. Read more...
Prevention is Best. Dental caries vary from superficial white decalcifications of the outer enamel which can be treated with remineralizing gels and high dose Fluoride toothpastes or gel in custom trays. Deeper caries require a dentist to remove the decay and restore the missing tooth structure and that can vary from a simple filling to a crown that covers most or all of the tooth above the gum line. Read more...

Is dental caries lifestyle or lifecycle problem?

Both. There is a genetic component to caries susceptibility. Some people are just more prone to caries. However, lifestyle - particularly diet and how well you take care of your teeth are critical in preventing caries. Good oral hygiene and regular visits to the dentist will help you keep a healthy mouth. Read more...
Both. Why some people are more susceptible to cavities than others is unclear. The structure of enamel proteins, the quality and quantity of saliva, and immune defense mechanisms against bacteria are all possible causes of susceptibility, and each has a genetic component. It is well understood, however, that prevention of dental decay is dependent on good oral hygiene and monitoring with check ups . Read more...
Both! If one has a poor diet, poor home oral hygiene and sees the dentists infrequently, than dental decay is a life style occurrence. If a person has certain illnesses ) such as Type 1Diabetes or ones that require medication to be stable, but cause a person's mouth to be dry, dental decay is a life cycle problem. The later is very common with seniors. Read more...

How to distinguish pain from dental caries and stain?

Stain doesn't hurt. Stain on your teeth can come from many things such as foods, beverages, or medications. It's usually something on the surface of your tooth and can come off with a dental cleaning. Dental caries can be painful if it's deep enough- especially sensitive to cold and/or sweets. Read more...

Can dental caries really cause death in severe cases?

Yes but. It can if it leads to an infection that gets out of control and invades sinus areas or sub-lingual areas of the jaw. But this is uncommon in todays' world with the advent of antibiotics and access to good dental care. Read more...
Yes. There have been reported deaths as the result of untreated dental caries (decay) leading to a significant abcess draining into the brain region. Read more...

Could dental caries really cause death in severe cases?

Yes. There have been reported deaths as the result of untreated dental caries (decay) leading to a significant abcess draining into the brain region. Read more...