What are the effects of breast cancer on the body?

This is complex.. The hope is to diagnosis breast cancer when it is confined to the breast. At this stage, the cancer does not affect the rest of the body, but the treatments can (side effects). When a cancer spreads, the effects depend on the area of the body that contains the cells that have spread. Most common: lungs, liver, brain, bone.
Uncontrolled growth. Cancer cells follow no rules. They start in one organ then spread to other parts, wreaking havoc along the way. The tumors will then interfere with the normal functions of the body until they become overwhelmed then start to shut down, ultimately leading to death. That's why it's important to find cancer in an early stage, when treatment is most effective.

Related Questions

What are effects of radiation for breast cancer on the body? Short and long term.

See below. Short term effects include fatigue and radiation dermatitis (like a bad sunburn). Long term effects may include heart (if radiating the left breast) or lung damage, though these are rare. Also rare, is another tumor called sarcoma in the field of radiation. This can occur more than 20 years after radiation. Read more...
Varies. Short term effects include fatigue and possibly some minor discomfort and skin changes. Long term effects include skin changes, increase risk of lymphadema, and a low risk of developing a second malignancy. Read more...

How can breast cancer affect the body?

Varies widely. Depends on the stage at time of diagnosis. Early stage cancer could have little affect, and advanced later stages can reduce a woman;s life expectancy. Later stage disease can spread and damage other organs if untreated. Read more...

What are the chances of breast cancer spreading to other parts of the body?

Good. Breast Cancer like all malignancies is programmed to spread. When first appearing as a lesion growing out of the milk duct, it remains in-situ for a period of time because clones or populations that spread havnt formed. As early mutations occur new populations of cells will leave the primary to spread, so that the rule is: The earlier the diagnosis the better the chance of cure. Read more...

If my breast cancer feed off estrogen bein a female how can I reduce it in my body?

"anti-estrogens" Great question. Breast cancer is associated with prolonged high estrogen levels (early menarche, late menopause, children later in life, estrogen replacement rx), not caused, meaning it's not a simple relationship. If you are trying to prevent breast cancer, a low-fat diet is advisable, which may keep estrogen levels down. For ca rx, anti-estrogens such as tamoxifen may counteract the estrogen. Read more...
Iodine. Iodine blocks estrogen receptors - take orally 13.8 mg per day available as iodozyme with biotics need 2pills comes as 6.25mg. Read more...
Anti-hormone drugs. If you have been diagnosed with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, you should be on a medication to either block estrogen (tamoxifen) or, if you are post-menopausal, to decrease the level of estrogen in your body (letrozole, anastrazole, or exemestane). You can lose weight if you are obese, which will also decrease the estrogen in your body. However, anti-estrogen drugs are very important! Read more...
Avoid estrogens. I agree with the other docs: you should be taking anti-estrogens. But it also helps to avoid xenoestrogens, which come in many forms. Phytoestrogens are in soy and other plant foods; hormone-treated dairy products contain estrogens, and "female" supplements like evening primrose oil are potent sources. Bpas from plastics mimic estrogen in the body; get a metal water bottle! Read more...

Why do breast cancer cells break away from the tumor and spread to other ograns of the body?

The Nature of Cancer. What makes a tumor malignant is the potential to break away from its organ of origin and take up residence in another one. Some cancer cells are better than others at travelling; others have more of a tendency to travel the longer they have been untreated. If we really understood the "why" part, we would be that much closer to curing all cancer. Read more...
Abnormal cells. Cancer cells have abnormal growth patterns allowing cells to multiply uncontrolled. They then have the ability to enter into lymphatics or blood vessels allowing them to move to other sites such as lymph nodes or other organs like lung, liver or bone, and start growing in their new location. Read more...

I'm a 2yr (TN) breast cancer survivor. Do the odds of having cancer again, same or different anywhere in the body increase as time goes on?

Congratulations. As a rule, the risk of recurrence of the cancer you had goes down with time. It varies a lot depending on the stage and receptor status and I'm afraid there's no magic number after which the risk is zero (I've seen it relapse more than 15 years after surgery). As to other cancers, the risk depends on the kind. Some cancers have shared risk factors, be it genetic or lifestyle, some others.... Read more...
No. Risk of recurrence in TNBC is greatest in first 2-3 yr. You should consider genetic testing, which is indicated in TNBC in women 60 yrs old or younger at diagnosis. Genetic testing might suggest other cancers that you may be at risk for. Read more...