Is atypical ductal hyperplasia common in women?

Yes. The presence of abnormal duct cells at the time of a breast biopsy (ADH (vasopressin)) is common. This is not a pre-cancerous condition, however, women with ADH (vasopressin) do have a 2 to 4 fold increased lifetime risk of developing breast cancer as compared to the general population.
I hope not. Atypical ductal hyperplasia is considered premalignant. It is very precurcer for breast cancer and needs to be removed in most cases. If not then very frequent monitoring must be done. Remover it won't go away on its own.

Related Questions

Are there natural drugs to take to treat atypical ductal hyperplasia?

I'd choose not to. A diagnosis of atypical ductal hyperplasia on a biopsy means we need to do surgery to remove the area out. If in case that diagnosis was made on a surgically removed specimen and if it was completely removed then it does not need any additional surgery. Sometimes tamoxifen can be used to follow up as a medical treatment but i would not recommend natural drugs for this diagnosis. Read more...

I have been diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia. I wasnt told much?

Ductal hyperplasia. Atypical hyperplasia forms when breast cells become abnormal in number, size, shape, growth pattern and appearance. It is only a concern because of the thought that over years it might develop into a cancer, but, in fact, most cases do not. A lot of the false positives and overdiagnosis and overtreatment of "breast cancer" are due to this condition. I recommend just regular routine mammograms. Read more...
ADH (vasopressin) ADH (vasopressin) is an incidental finding seen on biopsy of mammographic abnormalities. While it is not a pre-cancerous lesion, women with ADH (vasopressin) have a 3-5-fold increased lifetime risk of breast cancer (in either breast); therefore, careful screening and possible chemoprevention is advised. It is often difficult to tell the difference between ADH (vasopressin) and dcis on core biopsy--surgical biopsy is often recommended. Read more...
ADH (vasopressin) - risk marker. Long term, ADH (vasopressin) is a marker for elevated risk (2.5-4x's) and warrants increased screening (?Bmri) and possible chemoprevention. When found on a core biopsy, the standard is for open biopsy obtaining additional tissue to provide context for the pathology to exclude upgrading to dcis. It does not need to be completely excised with margins. Read more...

What should be my next step if I'm diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia?

See a breast surgeon. Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH (vasopressin)) can only be diagnosed by breast biopsy, and is often an incidental finding. This is not a pre-cancerous condition, however women with ADH (vasopressin) have a 2-4 fold increased lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. This warrants close surveillance, yearly mammograms, and consideration of "chemoprevention" by taking tamoxifen for 5 years. Read more...
Determine risks. If your lump has been entirely removed, you have time to consider your options. I would consider seeing an oncologist (doctor who specializes in cancer) who can determine your risks of developing cancer using the gail risk assessment scale. You might qualify for a clinical study of preventative treatments; at the very least you need to have close follow up for the rest of your life. Read more...
Chemoprevention. There is an increased risk of developing breast cancer associated with a tissue diagnosis of atypical ductal hyperplasia. This risk can be reduced by taking exists or tamoxifen. Please go and consult with a medical oncologist with an interest in breast cancer to discuss the risk and benefits of chemoprevention. Read more...

What exactly is atypical ductal hyperplasia (adh)?

Breast cancer marker. ADH (vasopressin) is an abnormal proliferation of breast duct cells that is benign but is associated with present or future breast cancer. ADH (vasopressin) is suspected on mammograms with microcalcifications and is diagnosed on needle biopsy and usually requires surgical excision. About 30% of excisions for ADH (vasopressin) will show cancer. For the other 70% of women the risk of developing breast cancer over the next 8 years is 3.7%. Read more...
Benign. Atypical ductal hyperplasia, abbreviated adh, (vasopressin) is the term used for a benign lesion of the breast that indicates an increased risk of breast cancer. The name of the entity is descriptive of the lesion; ADH (vasopressin) is characterized by cellular proliferation (hyperplasia) within one or two breast ducts and (histomorphologic) architectural abnormalities, i.e. The cells are arranged in an abnormal pattern. Read more...