When will my breast milk start to develop?

3-5 days after birth. The milk that we generally consider normal milk comes in about 3-5 days after delivery. Some women leak some milk while they are pregnant and that is normal too. The first milk after delivery is called colostrum. Colostrum is concentrated milk with all the nutrients that a newborn needs. It also contains some immunity that is passed from the mother to the baby as well.
This varies. Sometimes its during pregnancy, sometimes not till a few days after delivery. Both are normal.

Related Questions

If I don't eat enough will my breast milk be unhealthy?

Not unhealthy. A poor diet would not make breast milk unhealthy but it might decrease production. Read more...
Depends on diet. You can eat a diet based on your pre-pregnancy caloric needs & breast feeding will help you drop some of your pregnancy weight.The breast tends to strip your body of nutrients to make milk so it's important you maintain balanced nutrition.Odd diets can hurt you or baby. I've cared for severely anemic infants of mom's that decided to go on a banana diet, or eat only vegetables in another case. Read more...

Will my breast milk provide a large enough supply of vitamin d?

No. Unfortunately, studies show that even if taking prenatal vitamins, breast milk does not secrete sufficient amounts of vit d for babies. It is very important for your baby to get at least 400 iu vit d per day. Ask your pediatrician about which product he/she recommends. Vit d is not onlygood for your baby's bones, but also helpful to decrease risk for diabetes, autoimmune problems & some cancers. Read more...
No. Breast milk does not contain enough vitamin d for the baby. The american academy of pediatrics recommends supplementing wirh 400 international units (iu) per day. Read more...
No. We recommend 400 international units of vitamin d daily to all breast fed infants. This can be supplied by 1 ml daily of polyvisol over the counter. Read more...
Yes. Usually you will, but on rare occasions, mothers may have vitamin d deficiencies with a poor supply in the breast milk. Thus it is safer to give the baby a supplement of vitamin d to prevent even the possibility of poor bone development ( rickets). Read more...
No. God, nature, or darwin decided that we should create our own vitamin d through sun exposure. Even babies were meant to get it from the sun--even oversupplementation of mother's diet will not significantly add vitamin d to the milk. However, the damage that can be caused by the sun is not recommended either. Instead, keep breastfeeding and give at least 400 iu of vitamin d per day. Read more...
No. There is no vitamin d in breast milk; it's the only vitamin that doesn't pass through breast milk. That's why providers recommend that all babies get a special multivitamin for infants to supplement vitamin d. Read more...
No. Most americans are vitamin d deficient. Therefore, it is very likely that your breast milk is insufficent as well. Ask your doctor to check your vit d level. Aim for a level of >50 nanograms per milliliter. You can take 1000- 2000 iu /day and try to get some sun for 15 mins, 3x/week. Give 400 iu of vit d to your baby daily. Read more...
No. The general recommendation is that babies who are mostly breastfed, or completely breastfed, should be given extra vitamin d. It is believed that breastmilk alone may not provide enough vitamin d. Read more...
No. Of all the great things in breast milk, vitamin d is not one of them. If your baby is fed breast milk exclusively, he must be supplemented with vitamin d. Read more...
No. Current recommendations are for 400 iu vitamin d supplementation in exclusively breastfed babies. At this point, we don't know what amount of sun exposure would produce sufficient vitamin d production, and we don't know what amount is safe, especially in babies. The clinical significance of low levels of vitamin d is a hot topic right now, stay tuned as we wait for more specifics. Read more...
No. The american academy of pediatrics recommends giving vitamin d supplements to all breast-fed babies for at least the first year, as human milk does not contain enough vitamin d to prevent vitamin d deficiency, or rickets. The symptoms of rickets include softening of the bones, which can cause deformities and fractures. Read more...
No. Most infant does not get enough vitamin d from breast milk alone. Currently, it is recommended that all breast-fed infants are to receive 400 iu (international unit) of vitamin d daily. Available over the counter, 1.0 ml of tri- or polyvisol or other equivalents are choices. Read more...
Maybe. I differ in answering this than most pediatricians. I think the most current evidence shows that women who have adequate vitamin d levels produce breastmilk with adequate vitamin d levels and thus babies can have adequate d levels. What is adequate? Most studies have shown that bf moms who get 4000iu D3 or more per day have babies with sufficient d levels. Read more...

How can I ship breast milk?

Yes you can. Apparently if you do it properly you can ship it. If frozen you can keep it frozen with dry ice or if you want it refrigerated use gel packs. Ship it overnight with one of the express carriers and make sure they are aware of the contents. Read more...
Dry ice. You can consider sending frozen breast milk on dry ice, but you will need help finding it. Read more...

Tips to reduce breast milk?

3 main plans. Some prefer a quick method, bind up with super sized ace wrap & or pre-pregnancy bra & stop all feeds.You are miserable for a while but it works. Some drop one feeding a day until their supply drops off. Some use the baby or a breast pump to soften the the breast when it gets painful but but only enough to release the pressure while supplementing baby for the rest of the feeding. Read more...

Is it ok to freeze breast milk?

Yes. You can freeze your freshly pumped breastmilk for up to 3 months. It is best to keep it the back of your freezer to keep it very cold. Some report that if you have a separate deep freezer you may even keep it for longer. Read more...
Yes. Breast milk can stay for up to 6 months in the back of the freezer or in a deep freeze with a consistent temperature. Avoid keeping it in the door of the freezer as the temperature increases each time the freezer door opens. To defrost the breast milk, leave it in the refrigerator for a day before you plan on using it. Read more...