If my boyfriend sucks on my breasts can I still get breast cancer?

Yes. Neither stimulation nor suction to the nipple will have any effect on the risk of developing breast cancer.
Yes. This behavior does not increase or decrease cancer risk. Just do exams -self or by physician- and mammograms or other tests as your doctor recommends.

Related Questions

Could a guy still get breast cancer?

Yes. Maybe 2000 men get breast cancer each year, almost always as a lump on the nipple. We're catching it earlier nowadays but still around 400 men die of it yearly. Read more...

Can you tell me how is it that men can still get breast cancer?

Because men. Also have breasts , 1% breast cancers are in men , due to lack of awareness , diagnosed late , results in poor prognosis. Read more...

Docs, could a guy still get breast cancer?

Yes . Possible but rare. In the us, there are about 2, 100 new cases of male breast cancer and 450 deaths per year. Other countries have higher rates. Men with brca mutations have a higher chance, about 6-8% lifetime risk. If a man feels a lump in the breast, he should get a medical evaluation. Read more...

When you get silicone implants, is it possible to still get breast cancer?

Absolutely. There is no conclusive evidence that implants change the incidence of breast implants. You need regular exams and mammograms just like if you did not have implants. Read more...
Yes. When you get implants-silicone or saline- your breast tissue is still present. It thins out over time but is still there and at risk for cancer. Continue doing breast self exams and get regular mammograms. Read more...
Yes. Good afternoon! Breast augmentation surgery by either saline implants, silicone implants, or fat injections do not save you from the possibility of breast cancer. Implants do not increase your risk of breast cancer. To repeat- you can still get breast cancer if you have breast implants. Read more...
Yes, still possible. Implants do not have a protective effect. You can still get breast cancer, and so get screened and checked. They do not cause breast cancer. Folks were worried years ago about the Oppenheimer effect. It does not apply to Breast Implants. In fact, women with breast implants have a lower rate of breast cancer. Please see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. You will get your questions answered. Read more...

Can I still get breast implants after having breast cancer and radiation?

Yes. Fortunately yes :). We often recommend to wait several months before reconstruction and implants. Read more...
Yes, but. Although you can get implants after breast cancer and radiation, the results may be unpredictable. Radiation may cause some soft tissue fibrosis which may not allow the skin to stretch reliably. Although some people are fine with radiation, i think they tend to be the exception rather than the norm. Read more...
Yes...BUT. Radiation causes irreversible damage to the skin that actually worsens over time. This can cause the skin over the implant to break down and expose the implant. Many post-radiation implant reconstructions are done in conjunction with a flap of skin from the back for added safety. A skin flap from the abdomen without implants avoids these risks, and arguably offers better long-term aesthetics. Read more...
Possibly. You would best discuss this with the plastic surgeon and radiatin oncologist before assuming that you can. Read more...
Yes, but. Radiated skin sometimes doesn't give like non radiated skin, so although it may be possible, there are other options such as using your own tissue that you should consider as well. Read more...
Yes. Yes, you can still get breast implants after having breast cancer and radiation. It's recommended to wait several months after breast reconstruction to consider breast implants. Read more...

If a woman has a sex change operation and becomes a man, can she still get breast cancer?

Breast ca. Yes. Both men and women get breast cancer. The shutting off of the ovaries will decrease the estrogen production but the testosterone shots have their own issues. Regardless, the risk is still there. Read more...
Possibly. I would imagine risk is much lower because of the mastectomies and removal of ovaries, depending on stage of transformation. Read more...

If I were to get my breasts removed would I still be able to get breast cancer?

Yes. Women at high genetic risk for breast cancer who opt for prophylactic mastectomies still have a small rate of breast cancer. If there is quite a bit of breast cancer in your family, especially early, you may want to be tested for BRCA mutations. It's most important for you to know, however, that death from breast cancer is uncommon among women who self-examine faithfully & get screened. Read more...
Unlikely. If all your breast tissue was completey removed it would be less likely you would get breast cancer. Please speak with your parents first if this is your intention. Read more...
Breast cancer. Removal of healthy breasts in a fully developed woman essentially prevents one from getting breast cancer. It is possible that small amounts of breast tissue remain unless the underlying pectorals muscle is removed. In the above case one assumes that there is no abnormal tissue in the breasts before removal. Read more...

By having tiny breasts naturally, is it still possible to get breast cancer?

Yes. Depending on your family history, most all women have about a 12% lifetime risk of breast cancer. Other factors may increase risks depending on family history of breast cancer, earlier age of first menstrual cycle, late age at first childbirth. Read more...
Yes. Breast size is not really a prominent risk factor for breast cancer. The more important risk factors include family history, use of hormone replacement, nulliparity (have you delivered children), and age of menses/menopause. Read more...
Unfortunately yes. Breast cancer can occur even in a male breast which usually has very little breast tissue so women with small breasts can get cancer and the incidence specific to a patient is related to many factors including being a brca gene carrier, a positive family history, duration of menses years and whether or not it was interrupted by pregnancies etc. Best to get checked by your pcp or breast surgeon. Read more...