5 doctors weighed in:
If breast cancer runs in my family can I get breast cancer even i'm a man?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Travis Kidner
Surgery - Oncology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Possible
Although less common than women, men can develop breast cancer.

In brief: Possible
Although less common than women, men can develop breast cancer.
Dr. Travis Kidner
Dr. Travis Kidner
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2 comments
Dr. Daniel Careaga
Male breast cancers account for 1% of all breast cancer patients. Given the prevalence of breast cancer, it is more common than you might think. Men can carry the genes that cause breast cancer just as women can. It is important for men to examine themselves and notify their doctor of any new lumps.
Dr. Herbert Hoover
Breast masses on men are more commonly benign gynecomastia than cancer. They masses are usually painful and tender to touch.
Dr. Dariush Vaziri
Breast Surgery
In brief: Yes you can
Men can also get breast cancer whether or not breast cancer runs in their family.
Family history increases the risk. If there are palpable lumps, areas of thichening, swelling, breast symptoms, nipple discharge or any other concerns please have a medical exam to make sure the cause is determined. If a family member has had a positive brca test, you may want to consider testing too.

In brief: Yes you can
Men can also get breast cancer whether or not breast cancer runs in their family.
Family history increases the risk. If there are palpable lumps, areas of thichening, swelling, breast symptoms, nipple discharge or any other concerns please have a medical exam to make sure the cause is determined. If a family member has had a positive brca test, you may want to consider testing too.
Dr. Dariush Vaziri
Dr. Dariush Vaziri
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Dr. Barry Rosen
Surgery
In brief: Yes
While breast cancer is much less commen in men than women, it can occur with higher probability in patients with a hereditary predisposition to breast cancer. In fact, men with the brca-2 mutation may have a 5-10% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, as compared to the 0.
1% lifetime risk in men without this mutation.

In brief: Yes
While breast cancer is much less commen in men than women, it can occur with higher probability in patients with a hereditary predisposition to breast cancer. In fact, men with the brca-2 mutation may have a 5-10% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, as compared to the 0.
1% lifetime risk in men without this mutation.
Dr. Barry Rosen
Dr. Barry Rosen
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